AOMA Blog

5 Benefits of Doctoral Education in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine

Posted by Brian Becker on Thu, Dec 13, 2018 @ 02:39 PM

Dr. John Finnell, shares what he believes to be the top benefits of attaining a doctor of acupuncture and Oriental medicine degree. #tbt #throwbackthursday

More than ever, I believe that doctoral and post-graduate education prepare the next generation of thought leaders and clinicians to move the field of acupuncture and Oriental medicine forward.

Our role in healthcareacupuncture role in healthcare

Our healthcare landscape needs highly trained clinicians, researchers, and leaders to move the profession forward. Doctoral-level education provides parity at the policymaking table. This may operate institutionally, governmentally, or within the domain of patient care. Parity by title levels the playing field with regard to co-operative patient care.

Leadership

While a doctoral degree alone does not confer success, it does provide one with a credential to fill leadership positions within academia, act as the principle investigator on NIH-funded research, teach at the doctoral level, and oversee doctoral-level clinical education.

professional acupuncture opportunitiesProfessional opportunities

The respect brought by the doctoral title is a feature which enhances patient care and establishes parity with other doctorally prepared professions. Specifically, licensed acupuncturists with a doctorate often find better prospects for hospital employment and faculty positions, and for obtaining research grants and a seat at the table in policy-making processes.

 

Move the profession forward

Doctoral training does provide the rare opportunity for us to explore our intellectual passions and create a new body of knowledge as the fruit of our scholarship. This same scholarship is the cornerstone to the foundation upon which our profession is built. This is not a stagnant process; the evolution of acupuncture and Oriental medicine (AOM) in North America must be actualized through participation of its members. 

Actualizing requires a few key ingredients: vision, action, perseverance, belief, and transformation. All of these ingredients may be found as you pursue your career path. AOMA's DAOM program provides the platform upon which to solidify your role in the actualization of the field of AOM in the next century.

Lifetime learningdaom students

Finally, there are those of us who truly believe in the power of this medicine and want to learn as much as we can to better serve our patients. Improving your knowledge in pain management and the psychosocial aspects associated with pain is certain to improve patient outcomes and your satisfaction as an advanced practitioner of Chinese medicine.

Author bio

Dr. John doctoral program director is an accomplished researcher and skilled health care practitioner with a rich academic and professional background. His interest in lifestyle and environmental determinants of health led him to earn a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine and a Master of Science in Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine from Bastyr University, as well as a Master of Public Health in Epidemiology from the University of Washington. As a practitioner of Naturopathic and Chinese medicines, Dr. Finnell’s clinical focus is on nutrition, pharmacognosy, herb-drug interactions, mind-body medicine, disease prevention, and lifestyle education. In addition to maintaining a professional Naturopathic and Chinese medicine practice, Dr. Finnell has also completed a post-doctoral fellowship with the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), and served as the acting Director of Research for the TrueNorth Health Foundation. Dr. Finnell’s strong research background and clinical experience as a Naturopathic and Chinese medicine practitioner enable him to bring an evidence-based and integrative perspective to AOMA’s doctoral program.

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Topics: job opportunities, doctoral program, DAOM, Dr. John Finnell

Meet Katie: Registered Nurse Turned Acupuncture Student

Posted by Brian Becker on Tue, Nov 27, 2018 @ 12:10 PM

 Katie Shea

Please introduce yourself! Where are you from? Where did you go to undergraduate? What did you study? How far along/When did you start at AOMA?

My name is Katie Shea and I grew up in Chicago. I went to Michigan State University (Go Spartans!) for undergrad and received a bachelor’s degree in nursing. I began attending the master’s program at AOMA Fall of 2017.

What were you doing before you came to AOMA?

Before coming to AOMA, I was practicing as a registered nurse. I spent over a year in the emergency room immediately after graduating from college then transferred departments to work in a cardiac electrophysiology lab. I am continuing to practice as a nurse and work with cardiac patients while attending AOMA.

What was your first introduction to acupuncture and what was your impression?

My first introduction to acupuncture was at AOMA with Dr. Luo. I have always been interested in alternative therapies and was curious about TCM. I learned right away how effective acupuncture and herbs could be, as it quickly alleviated multiple vague symptoms I was experiencing at the time. Eventually, I began having regular treatments for both chronic and acute issues (I was training for a marathon at the time) and felt a deep connection to the subtle yet powerful nature of this medicine.

When did you become interested in studying Chinese medicine and why? What made you choose AOMA as your school and/or shift your career focus to come to AOMA?

Many factors were involved in my decision to embark on this journey into Chinese medicine. As a nurse, I understand the importance of providing safe and effective care to patients. I was also becoming familiar that one medical paradigm is not sufficient to solve all of the health concerns that face our modern world. As a yoga instructor and practitioner, I am also aware that there is much more to health than simply not getting sick; it is about learning how to listen to your body and act in a way that promotes balance. To me, that is the exact nature of Chinese medicine - to correct the small imbalances and promote harmony in the body in a nuanced yet long-lasting and sustainable way.

 What are some of your favorite classes and/or teachers at AOMA?

My favorite class at AOMA so far is Foundations with Dr. Wu. I could take this class over and over (which I did) and continue to learn so much from a professor that has an abundance of knowledge yet presents the material in a very simple way.

 What is your favorite thing about AOMA and why? Describe your experiences at AOMA.

My favorite aspect of AOMA is that everyone is so open, generous with their own personal challenges and health journeys, and unsparing with their energy and attention. I frequently find myself in an insightful conversation with a group of intelligent people that have very diverse backgrounds. I have also noticed the willingness of AOMA students to help one another in a time of need. On multiple occasions, I have been truly touched by the acts of kindness or simple gestures to help and support a fellow colleague. I feel very lucky to be involved in this community.

 Have you started treating as a student intern yet? If so, please describe a unique experience or something that surprised you.

I have not yet started to treat as an intern but there have been many unique moments that have surprised me, particularly in the acupuncture clinic at the Kerrville Folk Festival. It was incredible to see the amount of patients that AOMA students were able to serve, free of charge, in a modest, four-bed clinic. The complaints ranged from joint pain from worn-out musicians and heat-related issues from camping outside in Texas in June to deep emotional pain from years of trauma. Each patient displayed openness and gratitude and showed a willingness to contribute to their own healing by taking what the practitioner said seriously; this was something I did not expect in such a casual setting.

 What, if any perceptions of Chinese medicine have changed from when you started the program to now? What vision would you like to see for the future of healthcare?

For the most part, my perceptions of Chinese medicine have been consistent with my expectations entering the program. As I learn more, however, I realize that TCM and conventional medicine have more in common than many people realize. The two disciplines are simply describing the same body using a different language (both literally and figuratively) and coming to very similar conclusions. My hope for the future of healthcare is that we continue in a direction toward a multidisciplinary approach to patient care. It is no coincidence that one system picks up where the other leaves off; it is because both are necessary if the healthcare team intends to both treat illness while also maintaining positive health.

 What are you plans after graduation?

Following graduation, I would like to travel and volunteer my time and skills while acquiring the experience necessary to start my own practice. Eventually, my goal is to combine both eastern and western modalities in order to provide patients with well-rounded care. This will ideally include a multidisciplinary practice that utilizes many different approaches to healthcare in a way that not only treats illness but also supports optimal functioning.


Want to learn more about the Master's Program at AOMA? Contact the AOMA admissions office! 

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Topics: acupunture, student spotlight, acupuncture students, aoma students, acupuncture school

Meet Francesca: Massage Therapist, Mother of 4, and Acupuncture Student

Posted by Rob Davidson on Wed, Sep 26, 2018 @ 02:24 PM

 Francesca Moore-2

Please Introduce yourself! 

Hi, I am Francesca Moore, from New York. I attended Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and received a Bachelors of Industrial Design with a concentration on Fine Art Ceramics. I also did Post-Baccalaureate study in Fine Art Ceramics at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. In 2009 I made a drastic career change, leaving the world of art and design to work in the healing arts. I received my AOS in Massage Therapy and  Advanced Personal Training Certificate from the Swedish Institute in New York. I am a Licensed Massage Therapist and a Certified Strength an Conditioning Specialist through the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

I started at AOMA in Winter of 2015 and will officially graduate the Master's program in Fall 2018. I started working on my Professional Doctorate degree concurrently and hope to complete that coursework in 2019.

What are some of your other interests/hobbies outside Chinese medicine?

My husband and I have 4 small kids, ages 6, 4, 2 and 1.  We moved out to the Hill Country last year and hope to be able to spend more time enjoying nature. We love to hike with the kids and some day soon I hope to get back to cycling and kayaking.

What made you want to study acupuncture and Chinese medicine?

My experiences as a young designer in a high paced firm, quickly ascending the ranks, left me feeling out of balance, sick and miserable. Finding Chinese Medicine and working with a wonderful practitioner changed my entire being and gave me the new direction of working to help people improve their health. In the State of New York, half of the massage therapy training required is Five Element Shiatsu.Most of my instructors were also acupuncturists or students of Chinese medicine.

Chinese medicine concepts and Five Element theory were well integrated into my education at Swedish and I knew when I completed that training that I would become a student of Chinese Medicine some day. Ironically, one of my last design projects was a hotel in Beijing and my firm just finished a project in Chendu.

Please describe your top accomplishments since starting the program!

I passed my Herbal Board exam on the first try! My youngest son also turned 1. Keeping my children alive while being a student was definitely an accomplishment!

What did your AOMA education mean to you/prepare you for?

I have met so many wonderful people at AOMA! The connections I have made with other students and practitioners have been invaluable. I feel well prepared to provide high quality, patient centered care once I step out into the world as a licensed practitioner. AOMA has also prepared me for a lifetime of learning. I know I have only scratched the surface in my studies of Chinese Medicine and look forward to narrowing my focus and continuing my studies to specialize in TCM Pediatrics and Gynecology as well as Oncology. 

What, if any perceptions of Chinese medicine have changed from when you started the program to now?

Many of the OM practitioners I worked with in NYC were Classically trained students from a particular lineage who painted a picture of TCM as inferior to their traditions. It's clear to me now that it's all the same medicine.

What is your vision for the future of healthcare/medicine and your career moving forward?

The Bravewell Collaborative's definition of the integrative medicine approach, really resonates with me. I strongly value the partnership between patient and practitioner throughout the healing process and I trust the body’s innate response and ability to heal itself.  As medical providers, we have a responsibility to consider all factors that influence health, wellness and disease. We may not be able to affect change on them all, but when treating diseases of the body, we should consider how the mind, spirit, community and environment relate to causes of illness as well as treatment strategies. We should be aware that each of these factors is one piece of a larger puzzle for affecting change. I hope to practice in a fully integrative setting where I can collaborate with biomedical practitioners and practitioners of other CAM modalities.

What advice would you give to recent or soon-to-be graduates about to enter the field professionally?

Familiarize yourself with board exam topics and work on a study plan as early as possible. There are a few topics of study I wish I hadn't glossed over and a few other that I could have put on the back burner until after completing the licensing process...and stay on top of your portfolio! They aren't kidding!

AOMA is celebrating its 25th anniversary in 2018. Please tell your fondest memory of your studies here, and also feel free to give your Anniversary wishes!

One of my most formative experiences at AOMA was as an observer in clinic with Elizabeth Fordyce.  A patient came in crying and had been dealing with excruciating nerve pain for several days. Elizabeth came in to check on her, inserted one needle and the pain STOPPED.  It was incredible to watch and showed me the power of this medicine!

Happy Anniversary AOMA!   


Want to learn more about the Master's Program at AOMA? Contact the AOMA admissions office! 

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Topics: acupunture, student spotlight, acupuncture students, aoma students, acupuncture school

8 Ways Acupuncture Can Improve Wellness in the Workplace

Posted by Stephanee Owenby on Fri, Aug 31, 2018 @ 01:52 PM

stressworkplaceacupuncture

Workplaces can be hazardous to your health! Some job-related health concerns like back pain, stress, and colds and flus are quite well-known and get lots of media attention – probably because they’re so widespread. Many employees also suffer from less-obvious job-related health concerns like tobacco addiction, repetitive strain injuries, digital eye strain, and reduced mental acuity. The ultimate result of these workplace conditions is unhealthy, unhappy workers missing work and missing paychecks, which contributes to an overall decline in company productivity. And many employees don’t realize that their job is hurting them until they’re already suffering!

While they might be ancient forms of medicine, acupuncture and traditional Chinese herbs are still highly relevant in today’s workplace and can be effective methods for treating many common and not-so-common job-related health concerns. Read on to discover 8 ways that acupuncture can improve you -- and your employees’ -- health, happiness, and overall wellness in the workplace.

1. Relieve Pain

Acupuncture is most commonly associated with pain relief – at least in the United States. Medical professionals, insurance companies, and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs have extensively researched and proven the efficacy of acupuncture for pain relief, and are utilizing acupuncture for pain relief, particularly back pain. A recent study using fMRI imaging has shown that acupuncture changes the way the human brain perceives pain, reducing or modulating activity in the parts of the brain that are responsible for pain perception (Theysohn). The same study also showed that acupuncture reduces or modulates activity in the parts of the brain that are responsible for translating pain sensations into cognitive awareness, meaning a patient’s expectation of pain can be lowered by acupuncture as well.

Low back pain (LBP) is the second most common cause of disability in adults in the United States, and an estimated 149 million days of work per year are lost due to LBP (Freburger). An employee in pain is not a productive one, and neither long-term disability nor opioid addiction will make them more productive! While not as commonly-prescribed by physicians as painkillers, acupuncture is a safe and all-natural treatment for back pain that has proven to be more effective than no treatment (Brinkhaus). In addition to affecting brain activity and chemistry through the release of endorphins and serotonin, acupuncture relaxes muscles to increase blood flow and bring relief to tight or stressed tissues.

2. Reduce Stress

Our bodies are naturally hardwired to handle stress, but over time too much stress takes its toll! When we feel threatened the sympathetic nervous system is activated, causing the heart rate to increase, the pupils to dilate, and blood to be directed towards the extremities, which in turn causes digestion to temporarily shut down. Cortisol is also released, causing increases in blood pressure and inflammation while suppressing the immune system. If our bodies continue to release high amounts of cortisol, chronic symptoms such as anxiety, depression, fatigue, digestive issues, and tension headaches can develop.

In Chinese medical theory, strong emotions like stress interrupt the body’s energy from flowing smoothly. When these strong emotions are present for long periods of time they create a blockage in the body’s “road system” creating an energetic “traffic jam.”  Acupuncture increases the circulation of blood and oxygenates the tissues throughout the body while cycling out cortisol and releasing natural pain-killers called endorphins. Other benefits of acupuncture include decreasing the heart rate, lowering blood pressure, and relaxing the muscles to help the person feel less stressed.

3. Prevent Injuries & Promote Injury Recovery

Repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) are extremely common workplace injuries. As the name suggests they are injuries of overuse, resulting from repeating the same movements again and again, over prolonged periods of time. Many of us have jobs that require us to perform activities that put us at risk for an RSI every single day, including but not limited to heavy lifting, driving, exposure to loud noises, constant use of a computer mouse, and vibration of the whole body. To help prevent workplace injuries, “not only muscle weakness, but chronic muscle contracture, calcification, and inflammation must be addressed” (Reller). Acupuncture works to restore function to deep stabilizing and impinging muscles, so that chronic stress is decreased on joint tissues. The healthier joint and muscle tissue are, the more resilient and resistant to injury they become.

Once an employee suffers an occupational injury, acupuncture can reduce inflammation and swelling; stimulating tissue repair and decreasing recovery time. It can also increase strength and improve range of motion to aid the body’s natural healing, as well as increase flexibility to prevent future re-injury. Both insurers and employers are beginning to explore the potential favorable impact of acupuncture on workplace injury recovery. In fact, the Washington East Asian Medicine Association(WEAMA) is currently piloting a multi-year project to research and review acupuncture’s effectiveness at treating workers’ compensation injuries, with the end goal of allowing acupuncturists in Washington to be reimbursed for treating workers’ comp claims.

4. Eliminate Tobacco Use 

Despite the abundance of evidence regarding the negative effects of tobacco, people continue to use tobacco products because of the addictive nature and stress-reducing “comfort” of nicotine. But the health risks aren’t the only reason to quit - since 2014 the Affordable Care Act has permitted employers and insurance companies to charge tobacco users up to 50% more in health insurance premiums!

Acupuncture has been shown to have great success with treating a full range of addictions and addictive behaviors, and has been proven to be especially useful and successful in helping people quit using tobacco. Acupuncture works to adjust cravings by balancing brain chemistry and helping to heal the physical damage the body undergoes from using tobacco products.

Herbal medicine is frequently combined with acupuncture to control cravings and withdrawal symptoms; taking Chinese herbs throughout the day can help support the detoxification process and reduce relapses. In addition to curbing cravings and eliminating jitters, acupuncture can treat stress, irritability and restlessness, anxiety, headaches, and dry mouth. It also helps to promote relaxation, detoxification, and tissue repair.

5. Boost Immune System

According to the CDC, the flu causes workers in the United States to lose up to 111 million workdays, at an estimated cost of $7 billion a year in sick days and lost productivity. Acupuncture has been used for thousands of years to help enhance the immune system and ward off illness. Its immune-stimulating functions treat all types of cold and flu effectively, achieving a quick recovery without side effects. Several clinical studies have demonstrated that Chinese medicine reduces the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections in addition to shortening the course of illness. 

Chinese medicine views colds and flus as pathogenic invasions that can easily be expelled using specific acupuncture points and herbs. If caught in the early stages, especially within the first few hours of the onset of symptoms, acupuncture, herbal medicine, and qigongcan be very effective at eliminating pathogens before they have a chance to fully manifest. Once a cold or flu has progressed beyond the early stages, Chinese medicine can be used as symptomatic relief and adjunct therapy.

Particularly here in Austin during the fall and winter seasons, allergens like cedar pollen can cause intense and debilitating cold and flu-like symptoms. Traditional Chinese medicine views cedar fever as an overactive immune response, and acupuncture is an extremely effective method for calming down the immune system. This helps to reduce symptoms, and the overall balancing of the immune system helps to reduce the frequency and severity of future allergy reactions. A recent study by Dr. Benno Brinkhaus concluded that, in addition to being safe, acupuncture led to statistically significant improvements in the quality of life of allergy patients after just 8 weeks of treatment (Sifferlin).

6. Improve Sleep Quality

Insomnia is a serious disorder that is more than just tossing and turning to fall asleep or stay asleep. It is one of the most common sleep disorders, believed to impact almost 50% of all adults. Physical symptoms of fatigue are experienced along with feeling irritable, tense, lethargic, or even depressed. Insomniacs may also experience delayed reaction times, poor memory, focus, and concentration, increased distractions, and headaches.

Recent studies report that patients experienced a significant improvement in sleep quality, and a reduction in insomnia, fatigue and depression after receiving acupuncture (Spence). The nervous system is calmed by acupuncture, which clears obstructions in the muscle and nerve channels, creating a flow of oxygen-enriched blood to relax the nervous system and prepare for sleep. A preliminary report in 2004 found that even in patients with anxiety, acupuncture increased nighttime melatonin production and total sleep time (Spence). Using acupuncture and Chinese herbs can also help treat disturbances in the whole body that prevent restful sleep, such as chronic pain, breathing issues, and digestive distress.

7. Improve Memory, Focus, & Concentration

According to traditional Chinese medicine, the spirit or Shen of the Heart plays a prominent role in memory, focus, and concentration. “Shen influences long-term memory and the ability to think clearly, contributes to wisdom and presides over activities that involve mental and creative functions” (acufinder.com). Traditional Chinese herbal medicine formulas can help calm Shenand resolve any disharmony between brain and spirit, as well as increase blood flow to the brain and/or reduce foggy headedness. Traditional Chinese nutritional recommendations can also help to boost memory and focus, particularly foods that are high in essential nutrients such as flavonoids, Omega 3 fatty acids, folate, and iron (acufinder.com).

In addition to herbal treatment for brain function, studies have shown that acupuncture has a measurable “activating” effect on the brain. Areas of the brain known to respond to painkillers were activated, but so too was the insula, which is part of the cerebral cortex (von Bubnoff). While it is not entirely clear yet what this activation of the insula fully means, the cerebral cortex is a very large area of the brain that plays a key role in memory, attention, and cognition.

8. Relieve Symptoms of Digital Eye Strain

The American Optometric Association defines Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS)/Digital Eye Strain as a group of eye and vision-related problems that result from prolonged computer, tablet, e-reader, and cell phone use. Many individuals experience eye pain and vision problems when viewing digital screens for extended periods, and the level of discomfort seems to increase with the amount of digital screen use (Thorud). Viewing a computer or digital screen makes the eyes work harder; as a result, many individuals experience eyestrain, headaches, blurred vision, dry eyes, and/or neck and shoulder pain after prolonged computer use (Thorud). As more occupations require daily extended digital screen use, not to mention increased screen use during recreational hours, occurrences of eye strain, pain, and fatigue will rise. Studies have shown that acupuncture is an effective means of treating eye pain as well as ophthalmic migraine and dry eyes (Nepp).

In addition to eye pain, strain, and fatigue caused by too much screen time, acupuncture can boost overall visual acuity, reduce sensitivity to light, and reduce or eliminate eye floaters and blurred vision. 

Would you like more information? Are you interested in bringing acupuncture into your workplace? Contact the AOMA Clinics today!

Interested in scheduling an appointment with us? Request an Appointment online today!

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References:

  1. Janet K. Freburger, PT, PhDGeorge M. Holmes, PhDRobert P. Agans, PhDAnne M. Jackman, MSWJane D. Darter, BAAndrea S. Wallace, RN, PhDLiana D. Castel, PhDWilliam D. Kalsbeek, PhDTimothy S. Carey, MD, MPH

“The Rising Prevalence of Low Back Pain”

Arch Intern Med. 2009;169(3):251-258. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2008.543

http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/414769

  1. D. Warren Spence, M.A., Leonid Kayumov, Ph.D., DABSM, Adam Chen, Ph.D., Alan Lowe, M.D., Umesh Jain, M.D., Martin A. Katzman, M.D., Jianhua Shen, M.D., Boris Perelman, Ph.D., and Colin M. Shapiro, MBBCh, Ph.D., FRCP(C)

 “Acupuncture Increases Nocturnal Melatonin Secretion and Reduces Insomnia and Anxiety: A Preliminary Report”

The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, Volume 16, Issue 1, February 2004, pp. 19-28

http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/doi/abs/10.1176/jnp.16.1.19

  1. Sifferlin, Alexandra. “Is Acupuncture an Antidote for Allergies?”

Article published on Time.com on Feb. 19, 2013

http://healthland.time.com/2013/02/19/is-acupuncture-the-antidote-for-allergies/

  1. Benno Brinkhaus, MD; Claudia M. Witt, MD; Susanne Jena, MSc; et al

 “Acupuncture in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial”

Arch Intern Med. 2006;166(4):450-457. doi:10.1001/archinte.166.4.450

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/409858

  1. Nina Theysohn, M.D., Kyung-Eun Choi, M.Sc., Elke Gizewski, M.D., Ph.D., Thomas Rampp, M.D., Gustav Dobos, M.D., Ph.D., Michael Forsting, M.D., Ph.D., and Frauke Musial, Ph.D

“Acupuncture Changes Brain's Perception and Processing of Pain:

Radiological Society of North America press release on November 30, 2010

https://press.rsna.org/timssnet/media/pressreleases/pr_target.cfm?ID=515

  1. Von Bubnoff, Andreas. “Acupuncture Activates the Brain”

Article published on BioEd Online on May 1, 2005

http://www.bioedonline.org/news/nature-news/acupuncture-activates-brain/

  1. Nepp, Johannes; Jandrasits, Kerstin; Schauersberger, Joerg; Schild, Gebtraud; Wedrich, Andreas; Sabine, Gräser Lang; Spacek, Anna

“IS ACUPUNCTURE AN USEFUL TOOL FOR PAIN-TREATMENT IN OPHTHALMOLOGY?”

Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research, Volume 27, Numbers 3-4, 2002, pp. 171-182(12)

https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/aetr/2002/00000027/F0020003/art00002

  1. Thorud, Hanne-Mari Schiøtz*; Helland, Magne†; Aarås, Arne‡; Kvikstad, Tor Martin†; Lindberg, Lars Göran; Horgen, Gunnar

“Eye-Related Pain Induced by Visually Demanding Computer Work”

Optometry and Vision Science: April 2012 - Volume 89 - Issue 4 - p E452–E464

https://journals.lww.com/optvissci/Fulltext/2012/04000/Eye_Related_Pain_Induced_by_Visually_Demanding.13.aspx

  1. Acufinder.com Editorial Staff. “Boost Your Brain Power with Acupuncture”

https://www.acufinder.com/Acupuncture+Information/Detail/Boost+Your+Brain+Power+with+Acupuncture+

Meet Nicole: Peace Corp Volunteer turned Acupuncture Student

Posted by Rob Davidson on Mon, Jun 18, 2018 @ 04:17 PM

AOMA Student Spotlight Nicole

Please introduce yourself: Where are you from? Where did you go to undergraduate? What did you study? What program are you in here? How far along/When did you start at AOMA?

My name is Nicole. I grew up in Dallas, TX and went to Texas A&M University for my undergraduate degree in International and Environmental Studies. I started the Master’s program here at AOMA in 2016.

What were you doing before you came to AOMA?

Before AOMA I mostly worked in the non-profit world. I was a Peace Corps Volunteer for 27 months in Peace Corps Paraguay's program. In a twisted bout of fate, I trained a group of 15 health magnet high schoolers to teach peer-to-peer sex-ed and tools for emotionally healthy relationships. I returned home to Dallas for three years and worked in food insecurity at the North Texas Food Bank as their Child Programs Team Lead.

What are some of your favorite classes and/or teachers at AOMA?

Here's a huge list, because I couldn't choose one. Dr. Shen, Anne Cusick, Dr. Zhou, Dr. Wu and Dr. Song have taught me so much of what I know about patient-centered care and TCM today. There should be teaching awards for the work that Dr. Cone, Dr. Love and Dr. Becky Andrews do in the realm of western medicine.

What is your favorite thing about AOMA and why?

I love that it's such a warm and supportive community. I have met so many people here, and I don't even think I've had the time to really delve into those friendships as much as they deserve.

Have you started treating as a student intern yet? If so, describe a unique experience or something that surprised you.

Yes! I'm so glad that we start clinical work when we do. It's such a light at the end of the 4+ year academic tunnel that we have to get our Master's. Every patient who I see on my shifts brightens my day. If you are a patient and reading this, THANK YOU for trusting us with your health. You keep us sane throughout this program. 

What are you plans after graduation?

I'm still only halfway through my studies, but I do know that I would like to work with self-identified women, geriatrics, and have access to an herbal pharmacy. I'm not set on a geographical location yet but trusting that the right opportunities will show in a couple years as long as I keep saying "yes" to them! 

Do you have other interests/careers/hobbies you plan to also continue after graduation?

When I'm not cramming for a test, I find a lot of happiness in taking a stroll in my neighborhood, cycling and rock climbing. I still have part of my heart in the non-profit world and would love to work on making acupuncture more accessible for every socio-economic level when I graduate.

Want to learn more about AOMA's Master's Program? Download our Program Fact Sheet below:

Master's Program Fact Sheet

 

 

Topics: aoma students, acupuncture students, student spotlight, admissions

Jenna Valentine: Psychology Major & Youth Counselor, turned Acupuncture Student

Posted by Rob Davidson on Mon, Jun 18, 2018 @ 04:03 PM

Student Spotlight_ Jenna Valentine-1

Please introduce yourself! Where are you from? Where did you go to undergraduate? What did you study? How far along/When did you start at AOMA?

Hi. My name is Jenna Valentine and I am originally from Northern California. I graduated from Occidental College in 2004 with a degree in Psychology/minor in Spanish and started at AOMA in Fall 2017. 

What were you doing before you came to AOMA?

Lots of cool things happened in the 10+ years between graduating from undergrad and starting graduate school:  I worked in the child welfare/juvenile justice system, ran an after-school program for at-risk youth, got married, had a baby, moved to Austin, got divorced, and started this new iteration of my life. 

What was your first introduction to acupuncture and what was your impression?

I’ve been a pretty major fan of Acupuncture since college when I went to a fundraiser where it was being offered and saw immediate results. I got treatments on and off (including labor induction!) and nagged all my friends/family to try it (I can be very persuasive!), but I never made the connection that I could be the person doing rather than simply receiving the treatment.  

When did you become interested in studying Chinese medicine and why? What made you choose AOMA as your school and/or shift your career focus to come to AOMA?

My divorce launched me out of stay-at-home mom world and I met with a career counselor to decide my next steps. In a brainstorming session, we both realized that helping others through finding health and wellness was my true passion. Acupuncture provided the crossroads between emotional and physical health as this medicine does not separate the two. AOMA was the ideal fit as I was committed to staying in Austin and had already heard wonderful feedback about the program. 

You mentioned that helping others through finding health and wellness was your true passion. Do you think that’s what drew you to psychology too initially?

I was drawn to study psychology as I wanted to work with vulnerable populations. I volunteered at a homeless shelter during high school and was committed to helping at-risk youth from an early age. During college, I worked with veterans with mental illness and substance abuse issues as well as counselor referred youth. I’ve worked with teen moms, gang members, trauma victims, and am committed to helping people find their path to a fulfilling life.

You also mention that acupuncture and Chinese medicine provides "the crossroads between emotional and physical health as this medicine does not separate the two." Can you speak to how, in your opinion and experience, acupuncture and Chinese medicine specifically can improve emotional health?

It was so refreshing to learn that Chinese medicine views emotions and physical health as an integrated experience. Big emotions can impact physical health and compromised physical health can impact emotions. This is so obvious to me and so frustrating when people don’t “get it”. I love learning about specific points, such as the ghost point category, that directly related to emotional health. I hope to delve more deeply into this area of the medicine.

What are some of your favorite classes and/or teachers at AOMA?

I have enjoyed all of my classes and professors at AOMA. The diverse teaching methods and perspectives create wonderful learning opportunities and I have felt incredibly supported by all the staff.  I haven’t had classes with all the faculty yet, but the classes I have taken have been wonderful. Dr. Mandyam and Dr. Shen are two of the most low-key hilarious people. They are both brilliant and their dry senses of humor make their classes amazing. Dr. Cone is such a joy to learn from and his passion is contagious. 

Dr. Tan has the most beautiful, poetic way of explaining Chinese culture to us and helping us understand the larger context of this medicine. Dr. Song and Dr. Zhou’s knowledge of herbs is unreal and their patience as we try to learn from them is unparalleled. Justin Phillips is so generous with his knowledge and always seems happy to take time out of his day to chat about what he has learned. Anne Cusick and Dr. Love are two of the sweetest and smartest cheerleaders always taking the time to help students regain their confidence during their learning curves. 

Robert Laguna is a star. He will bend over backwards to help anyone and he provides students with both big picture and real-world knowledge. Dr. Luo always goes the extra mile bringing in photos and stories of China, his life, and experiences. Dr. Yan & Dr. Xu manage both grace and strength as they teach us Taiji and Qigong with seemingly limitless patience. Dr. Fan is so strong it’s ridiculous and makes Tuina seem easy (spoiler alert: it’s not). And, last but not least, Dr. Wu is as magical as everyone says. 

What is your favorite thing about AOMA and why? Describe so far your experiences as a student at AOMA?

AOMA is such a sweet community of people dedicated to serving people. It has been a balance being a single mom, working, maintaining relationships, having adequate self care and managing the rigorous program, but I have felt incredible support from the students, faculty, and administration. 

Have you started treating as a student intern yet? If so, please describe a unique experience or something that surprised you.

I’ve recently started treating in the student clinics and have been surprised at how incredibly kind the patients have all been even though many are in pain. 

What, if any perceptions of Chinese medicine have changed from when you started the program to now? What vision would you like to see for the future of healthcare?

 Prior to starting at AOMA, I think I viewed Acupuncture as a secondary medicine. I remember someone asking me if I was in medical school and I said, “No, I’m in school for acupuncture.”  Boy was I in for a surprise when I realized I was, in fact, in medical school. The Western world has a way of devaluing the “alternative” and there seems to be an unspoken assumption that one only uses ‘the alternative’ when one cannot get ‘the real thing.’ So, I guess we need to stop calling Chinese Medicine “alternative medicine” or “Eastern medicine” and simply call it what it is: Medicine. 

What are you plans after graduation?

As for my plans after graduation. . . I am blissfully unsure. The current vision is to find a way to get paid to travel the world and offer this medicine all over. I would love to work in a wellness center especially one that has a mobile component. I will also be continuing to raise my incredible daughter, perfect my right hook at the boxing gym, provide coaching and support about relationship/intimacy issues, and spend too much time laughing at memes on the internet. 

Jenna is a student in AOMA's Master's Program. To learn more about our Master's Degree program click below!

Master's Program Fact Sheet

Topics: acupuncture students, aoma students, student spotlight, admissions

Anne Cusick: AOMA Alum Turned Faculty

Posted by Rob Davidson on Wed, Apr 25, 2018 @ 04:26 PM

Anne Cusick AOMA Acupuncture Faculty

Anne Cusick is one of AOMA's Master's program professors, teaching Acupuncture Techniques 2In addition to maintaining her private clinical practice, she is active in the local integrative medicine community, where she works collaboratively with a family medicine doctor to deliver comprehensive patient care. Since graduating from AOMA, she specializes in pain management, stress relief, digestive health, and the treatment sleep disorders in her practice. In addition to her studies at the AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine, she has also completed extensive training in Shen-Hammer Pulse Diagnosis and Traditional Japanese Acupuncture. Anne is also one of the most beloved clinic supervisors by her students!

We caught up with Anne to find out more about getting into Chinese medicine, and the transition from study, to practice, to teaching!

When did you graduate?  April 2008.

When did you start working at AOMA? January 2014.

What’s your favorite thing about AOMA? The people.

Why did you decide to teach at AOMA?

Being a student at AOMA was one of the highlights of my path thus far.  To be a part of AOMA again was a blessing.

What’s your favorite part of teaching Chinese medicine?

The history, where the tools, philosophies and techniques emerged from and how they have transcended through the years.

What is a favorite book or favorite quote of yours, and why?  

One of my favorites is The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran. It has great insights on balance.

What advice would you give to new acupuncturists?  

Plant roots. Choose a community you would love to work in, and help nurture it.   

What’s your favorite thing about living in Austin?

The micro and macro communities. It is possible to find something you love in Austin and easy to find people whom share the same interests. 

Want to learn more about the Master's Program at AOMA? Schedule a campus tour and sit in on a class with us!

Schedule a Campus Tour

 

 

Topics: alumni spotlight, alumni, faculty spotlight

8 Community-Minded Local Businesses in Austin

Posted by Rob Davidson on Mon, Apr 23, 2018 @ 03:04 PM

Austin Mural-015445-edited

Austin, TX is often ranked the best city in Texas to live in for many reasons. We wrote a blog on that topic previously, but we want to focus in on all the amazing small businesses that keep a heavy focus on staying local and community-oriented.  At AOMA, our mission is to transform lives and communities, so we firmly believe in businesses that think about our community too. We are so fortunate to be located in South Austin, surrounded by so many local community minded merchants! If you’re new to Austin, or just visiting, we recommend you stop by these fine establishments that are local and community minded.

1. Juiceland

juiceland

Founded in 2011 by Matt Shook, Juiceland is a diverse juicebar offering healthy fresh pressed juices and smoothies. They also offer healthy snacks and small meals ready to go. Juiceland is iconic to Austin as a place to recharge with refreshing juice or a smoothie. Perfect place for a health conscious juice, salad or energy boost.

4526 West Gate Blvd A, Austin, TX 78745

2. Wheatsville Food Co-op

Wheasville

Wheatsville is a food co-op located off of South lamar and Ben White Blvd. They feature a large-selection of locally grown goods and organic produce, specifically from Austin’s own Johnson’s Backyard Garden. They also have a wide selection of vegan/paleo products, a hot food bar, salad bar, deli and smoothie counter. They even have nitro locally-sourced cold brew on tap. Perfect place to grab local-made eats, treats, produce and beverages.

4001 S Lamar Blvd, Austin, TX 78704

3. People’s Pharmacy

people's rx

People’s Pharmacy takes a natural approach to your local pharmacy. They sell a selection of paleo-friendly and vegan-friendly foods as well as natural supplements, with trained naturopaths on staff. They also serve food at an in-house deli counter which features soups, smoothies, sandwiches, breakfast tacos and more! You can also get health testing, coaching and meal plans done to help you achieve your health and wellness goals. Perfect way to fight allergies and stay healthy!
 
3801 S Lamar Blvd, Austin, TX 78704

4. Black Swan Yoga

Black Swan Yoga Daily Texan

Black Swan Yoga has several locations in Austin and yearly named to the list of Austin’s best yoga studios. Their studios feature lobby-less heated yoga rooms and generally follow a vinyasa flow format. Best of all their classes are donation-based! Their south location is just across the street from AOMA on West Gate Blvd. Perfect way to de-stress and detox!

4534 West Gate Blvd, Austin, TX 78745

5. Crux Climbing

Crux Climbing

Crux Climbing Center was founded by two local Austin climbers who designed the facility to be more of a community space than a gym. Crux features family friendly climbing for all ages including space for strength training, yoga, and fitness classes. The indoor 22,000 square foot facility in South Austin has plenty to do so you’ll never be bored! Perfect weekend activity (that’s indoors!).

121 Pickle Rd #100, Austin, TX 78704

6. El Chilito

El Chilito

El Chilito is one of Austin’s favorite taco stands. They’re known for their “wonderful interior Mexican” food such as delicious and authentic breakfast tacos, migas, and agua frescas! Each location has a full coffee bar and outdoor patio seating! Perfect spot for a quick lunch pickup or coffee break.

4501 Manchaca Rd, Austin, TX 78745

7. Radio Coffee and Beer

Radio Coffee

Radio Coffee is located in a refurbished classic home in South Austin. You’ll find many of our AOMA students there studying on any given day! They have a large outdoor patio that’s climate controlled! They also show movies, feature live music, and generally kid and dog friendly. Radio also serves a large selection of craft beer, kombucha and coffee. You’ll also find Vera Cruz taco truck on site as well. Perfect place for a study break, or drink with friends.

4204 Manchaca Rd, Austin, TX 78704

8. AOMA Herbal Medicine

IMG_0083 copy

If you’re in town, stop by our herbal medicine dispensary and retail store for a selection of over the counter and prescription Chinese herbal formulas, gifts, snacks, drinks, meditation pillows and so much more! Each of our stores has a licensed Chinese herbalist on staff to help you with any questions pertaining to Chinese herbs. They’ll be able to answer any of your questions! We have a south and north Austin location to choose from!

AOMA Herbal Medicine:

South - 4701 West Gate Boulevard, Bldg B, Austin, TX 78745
North - 2700 W Anderson Ln #504, Austin, TX 78757

 

Want to learn more about Chinese medicine? Download our guide!

Introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Nutrition

 

Topics: Austin, herbal medicine

10 Iconic Things to Do in Austin, Texas (That keep it Weird!)

Posted by Rob Davidson on Wed, Apr 11, 2018 @ 03:02 PM

10 Iconic Things to Do in Austin, Texas

Austin is one of those places you visit and never want to leave. Which is why our students love living here so much! Our student population at AOMA comes from diverse backgrounds and locations, from places all across the country and overseas. While they’re here, when they are able to take a break from studying, they venture out and take in the beautiful city of Austin, a place with plenty to do and see!

With a focus on local business and a taste for “weird”, you’ll find many iconic spots in Austin that you won’t find anywhere else. We’ve compiled a list of some of the most unique places to visit while staying in Austin that “Keep Austin Weird.”

 

Jo's Coffee Austin TX

1. Jo’s Coffee & the "I love you so much" Wall

This local coffee shop, owned and operated by the same owners as neighboring San Jose Hotel, boasts a piece of the city’s most iconic street art. When you scroll through photos of Austin on social media, you’ll likely see couples and bff’s standing next to the “I love you so much” - street graffiti turned photo backdrop! Jo’s Coffee brings together the South Congress neighborhood for good coffee, food and often Live Music. Grab a cup of Jo’s coffee and explore the shops and sights of South Congress Avenue or downtown at their 2nd Street District location - two of South Austin’s most famous local shopping districts.

Jo's South Congress: 1300 South Congress Avenue, Austin, Texas 78704
Jo's Downtown: 242 West 2nd Street, Austin, TX 78701

Cathedral of Junk Austin TX

2. Cathedral of Junk

They say one man’s junk is another man’s treasure. This couldn’t be more apparent than Austin’s Cathedral of Junk, where junk is overtly displayed as art! Vince Hannemann started building his cathedral in 1988. It’s been a slow growing pile of junk that Vince has turned into his own masterpiece, constantly changing and growing over the years. Tours are allowed but by appointment only - so you better call ahead!

Location: 4424 Lareina Dr, Austin, TX 78745, 512-299-7413

Austin TX bats South Congress bridge
(Photo credit: www.batsinaustin.com)

3. South Congress Bats

One of Austin’s most popular tourist attractions is watching the bats from the South Congress bridge. These bats come out to feed just before sunset from underneath the South Congress Avenue bridge, which crosses Lady Bird Lake. Enjoy a vantage point from the bridge, the lawn of the Austin American Statesman, or even consider an evening of bat-seeing on a boat ride with the Lone Star Riverboat. Make sure to check the season before you go out there - the bats are only here over the summer months before they travel to South America.

For more information, check out: http://www.batsinaustin.com.

Location: Congress Ave Bridge, Austin, TX 78704

Zilker Park Austin TX skyline

4. Zilker Park

(Home to Festivals such as ACL, Austin Kite Festival, and Trail of Lights)

Zilker park is considered the “most-loved” park in Austin. This 350-acre park is perfect for a picnic, a place to take the dogs off leash or hang out and practice yoga with friends! Zilker park connects to the urban Lady Bird Butler Trails Hike and Bike Trail, an 11-mile trail that circles around the city. Also within Zilker you’ll find Barton Springs pool - an Austin iconic spring-fed natural pool, as well as the trailhead to the Barton Creek greenbelt which winds and stretches several miles north into the Barton hills and Westlake neighborhoods.

Also home to many iconic Austin festivals such as Austin City Limits, ABC Kite Festival, as well as the annual Trail of Lights and Zilker Christmas Tree lighting, Zilker offers relaxation and recreation with a beautiful view of our downtown skyline.

Location: 2100 Barton Springs Rd, Austin, TX 78704

Peter Pan Mini-Golf Austin TX
(Photo credit: www.365thingsaustin.com)

5. Peter Pan Mini Golf

When driving on Barton Springs Road, you may notice a large Peter Pan or T-Rex statue popping out above the treeline. Peter Pan mini golf is a popular spot to spend some time with friends playing a round or two of miniature golf. It’s $7 per person, and BYOB. A local favorite for an inexpensive night on the town.

Location: 1207 Barton Springs Rd, Austin, TX 78704

Blue Cat Cafe Austin TX
(Photo credit: www.houstonpress.com)

6. Blue Cat Cafe

Do you love felines but aren’t ready for one at home? Blue Cat Cafe allows you to dine with your furry friends. What’s even better is they allow you to adopt any cats you can’t go home without. With a $5 entry fee, you can spend your day petting sweet cats and enjoying good food.

Location: 95 Navasota St, Austin, TX 78702

Broken Spoke Austin TX
(Photo credit: austin.curbed.com)

7. Two Stepping at the Broken Spoke

Let’s face it - Austin may be a big city, but we’re still in Texas. And that means there’s bound to be a lot of country music going on. Austin has a thriving bluegrass, blues, country and folk scene. One of Austin’s most famous venues for Country Western music is the long-established Broken Spoke, where many famous country stars have performed, including Willie Nelson, Garth Brooks, Joe Ely, and Dale Watson. Get yourself some boots and enjoy two-stepping at this local honky-tonk!

Location: 3201 S Lamar Blvd, Austin, TX 78704

Alamo Drafthouse Austin TX

8. Singalongs at ALAMO Drafthouse

Austin is home to the dine-in movie theatre experience. It all started with one movie theatre and a couple with a vision to change how we experience going out to see a movie. Austin is home to Alamo Drafthouse, now becoming popular nationwide. Not only can you enjoy a tasty menu and drinks while you enjoy the picture, but they also host special events including singalongs to your favorite musical films! With private viewing parties and dressing up as characters for movie nights, it’s a one of a kind experience you don’t want to miss!

Nearest location to AOMA: 1120 S Lamar Blvd, Austin, TX 78704

swanboat Austin TX
(Photo credit: www.funjunkie.com)

9. Swan Pedal Boat on Lake Austin

Want to enjoy the most relaxing activity in Austin? Try out a Swan Pedal Boat on Lake Austin. You won’t have to paddle, the pedals will do all the work! Hosted by Capital Cruises, the swan boats will help you enjoy Lady Bird Lake while also looking like a regal swan floating along the water. Covered swans are also available for those hot summer days!

Find out more at: www.CapitalCruises.com.
Location: 1211, 208 Barton Springs Rd, Austin, TX 78704

Austin TX Museum of the Weird

10. Austin Museum of the Weird

No city of self-proclaimed weirdness would be complete without a Museum of the Weird! Self-described as “America’s Strangest Attraction”, the museum features life-size wax figures, real mummies, and even shrunken heads! The Museum of the Weird might be the most literal reflection of “Keep Austin Weird”, and it’s sure to entertain.

Tip: While you’re there. explore the rest of 6th street - a dense concentration of live music, food, and drinks that help put Austin on the map as the “Live Music Capital of the World”.

Location: 412 E 6th St, Austin, TX 78701

We hope you enjoy our city while you’re here!

Want to see more to do in Austin? Download our Guide to Austin!

Download a Guide to Austin, Texas

While you're in town, come see us for an acupuncture visit!

Request an Appointment

 

Topics: moving to Austin, Austin

Meditation & The Five Senses: How to Enhance Your Meditation Practice

Posted by Sandra Hurtubise on Fri, Mar 30, 2018 @ 02:28 PM

Meditation Austin AOMA

Meditation is a mind-body practice that allows one to calm their mind from the fast pace and stresses of life. When we take time to slow down and focus on the present, we eliminate many of the stress responses in our bodies. Some enjoy seated, silent meditation, while others enjoy triggering each of their senses to enhance their relaxation. Soothing our five senses can help us more easily enter a meditative state. As meditation becomes more popular and more people begin to cultivate a regular practice, it becomes important to find things that make it easier to make meditation a habit. There are some helpful props and accessories that will make your meditation more practice comfortable and centered. We have compiled five items that will help aid in each sensory aspect of your meditation practice.

1. Sense of Sight in Meditation

Salt Lamps AOMA Austin

Salt lamps create a dim lighting for any room perfect for a meditation practice. Along with the relaxing lighting, salt lamps are said to create negative ions and can increase overall energy in your space. Salt lamps are made by a large chopped off chunk of Himalayan pink salt with a light bulb in the middle causing the salt to glow and warm from within. In addition to salt lamps, candles also create a meditative lighting and focal point for deepening your meditation.

2. Sense of Smell in Meditation

Essential Oil Diffuser AOMA Austin

Essential oil diffusers are commonly used in homes and offices as an alternative to chemical-based air fresheners and purifier sprays. They are also a safe and easy way to receive relaxing aromatherapy during your meditation practice. Choose from many different oils for your desired effect! Some oils can be sedating while others energizing. The benefits of aromatherapy include stress relief, mental focus, allergy relief, and more!

3. Sense of Touch in Meditation

Meditation Pillows AOMA Austin

Meditation pillows are essential for any meditation practice. Sitting for long periods of time can cause discomfort in the body, even sometimes causing body parts to feel “asleep”. Pillows can help in a seated meditation to keep posture straight and relieve pressure from their buttocks. Making a meditation practice comfortable is a great way to stick with it! Mala beads are another powerful and symbolic tool for meditation. Mala beads can be held during meditation practice as a tactile point of focus. The 108 beads on a traditional mala are said to help focus your meditation on your internal mantra, or focused thought that guides your practice. By repeating over and over again as you grip each bead in your hand going all the way around the mala, you can meditate on your mantra through mindful repetition.

Sense of Sound in Meditation

Chakra Bowls Austin TX

There are many forms of sound therapy and meditation audio technology that assists you in going deeper in your meditation practice. Bowls can also be used to create soothing tones that help to focus the mind. Many meditators also enjoy guided meditation audio, or simply the sounds of nature. Whatever audio source you decide on for your meditation practice, pick something that will not be distracting and help your mind focus you on the present moment.

Sense of Taste in Meditation

Herbal TEA AOMA Austin

Tea can be a calming way to relax and reflect after a meditation practice. The act of sipping tea in and of itself can be meditative. Tea can even be enjoyed before meditation as a way of slowing down to prepare one’s self to enter a calm state of mind. Tea can be both stimulating and relaxing. A good combination of both could help keep you both alert yet relaxed while you meditate.

Helping yourself relax by way of incorporating all the 5 senses will help you have a deeper meditation experience. We hope you consider enhancing your meditation practice with these above tools.

Most of these meditation tools can be purchased from the AOMA Store.

AOMA Herbal Medicine:

North Austin: 2700 W. Anderson Ln. Suite 504, Austin, TX 78757 (512) 323-6720
South Austin: 4701 West Gate Blvd. Building B, Austin, TX 78745 (512) 693-4372

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