AOMA Blog

5 TCM Tips for Taking Care: Spring

Posted by Sarah Bentley on Mon, May 19, 2014 @ 10:40 AM

Spring comes and goes fast in Austin. With summer just around the corner, what can we do now to strengthen our body and mind?

Here are AOMA’s traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) tips for staying healthy, happy, and in harmony with the season of spring.

1. Wear a scarf

  • Wind is one of the six pernicious evils (Wind, Cold, Heat, Damp, Dryness, and Summer Heat), and it is the external evil associated with spring.
  • Many of the points that can be easily affected by Wind are on the upper back, neck, and head.
  • Wearing a scarf or hoodie, especially when it’s windy or after an acupuncture treatment, can help prevent wind attack.
  • Common symptoms of wind attack:

◦     common cold

◦     headache

◦     nasal obstruction

◦     itching

◦     allergies and rashes, to name a few

  • When your acupuncturist tells you to stay covered up after a treatment, the wind points may be more open. So risk looking like a hipster to prevent catching a wind invasion.

2. Eat your greensgreen salad

  • Spring is charged by the energy of the Liver and the color green.
  • It is a vital time to eat foods that are sprouting, in harmony with the natural growth of the season. Eating more of the light, healthy greens like asparagus, kale, collards, watercress, and lettuce while avoiding rich foods can help to unblock the heavy energy of the previous winter months. 
  • Pungent foods like garlic, onions, peppermint, basil, dill, fennel, and rosemary all work well at supporting the upward and outward energy of spring and unblocking stuck energy.
  • Start the day with a glass of warm water with the juice of half a lemon. The sour flavor soothes the liver and helps rid the body of toxins.

3. Let go of old grudges

  • Holding on to anger constrains the Liver and its natural harmony.
  • Developing self-care for the spirit is just as important as what we do for our body.
  • Consider journaling, writing poems, or meditating on letting go. You don’t need to have confrontations to heal.
  • Forgiveness can be very therapeutic for balancing energy and is in perfect harmony with spring.

4. Move your qi to put some spring in your tai chi austin, qigong austinstep

  • Whether it’s taking a walk in the open air, starting a taiji or qigong practice, or joining a gym, spring is a wonderful time for renewal, growth, and transformation.
  • Breathing fresh air supports the Lung qi which directly balances your Liver qi.
  • Liver qi stagnation can manifest as irritability, digestive upset, PMS, depression, and poor appetite, just to name a few.
  • Ask your acupuncturist to show you some exercises for harmonizing the Liver and get that qi moving smoothly.

5. Get acupuncture

  • Nothing can support your efforts to cleanse and detox the Liver like a springtime acupuncture treatment.
  • Acupuncture stimulates the channels, clears out stagnation, and smooths the flow of qi.
  • Liver qi stagnation (irritability, depression, PMS, etc.) responds well to acupuncture.
  • While all treatments are tailored to the individual, the practitioner will be working in conjunction with the ancient principals of seasonal movement of qi and can help to harmonize your body.

 

Stay tuned for our tips to beat the heat of the upcoming summer months.

Introduction to Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine

About the author

lauren st pierreLauren has lived in Austin since 2006 by way of Lake Tahoe, California. While pursuing her MAcOM at AOMA she continues to work with The American Cancer Society as a cancer information specialist. She counts ATX as her home with her husband and two Boston terriers. http://www.earthspringacupuncture.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topics: Traditional Chinese Medicine, chinese medicine philosophy, Complementary Medicine

5 Tips to Get Your Insurance Company to Pay for Acupuncture

Posted by Sarah Bentley on Tue, Feb 26, 2013 @ 04:05 PM

1. Write to your insurance company and your employer

acupuncture insurance

If you have an insurance plan that doesn’t cover acupuncture one of the best things you can do is to write a letter to your insurance company, and to your Human Resources representative if you receive insurance benefits through your employer. Your insurance company can make changes at the next renewal of your policy or risk losing your business, and often your employer is involved in choosing which benefits will be included in a corporate-sponsored insurance policy.

Over the past several months AOMA has been spearheading a letter-writing campaign to national insurance companies and local employers, petitioning them to open their networks more fully to acupuncture coverage. To participate in AOMA’s letter-writing campaign please contact sowenby@aoma.edu and we can provide you with a form letter to send, or call 512-492-3076. You can also speak to a clinic receptionist at your next appointment and they will provide you with a form letter and a stamped envelope. If you would like to give your feedback to your insurance company over the phone or electronically, detailed contact information can usually be found on the back of your insurance card.

NOTE: Some insurance companies like Cigna and Aetna have closed networks, meaning they place restrictions on allowing new providers to join based usually on geographical location. If you are insured with one of these companies you can write a letter petitioning them to open their networks up to AOMA’s providers and allowing you to use your insurance benefits at the AOMA Professional Clinics.

Thank you in advance for helping AOMA to transform new lives and communities!

 

2. Encourage friends and co-workers to write letters.

If you receive insurance benefits through your employer this is especially important because you need to let your company know that there is a high demand for acupuncture coverage among its employees! With large numbers of employees touting the benefits of acupuncture and asking for it to be a covered service, an employer is more likely to research acupuncture and consider adding it to the company insurance plan.

 

3. Get involved with acupuncture activism.

Getting involved with acupuncture activism can range from things as simple as signing your name to a petition to joining acupuncturists and acupuncture supporters for demonstration rallies. The Texas Association of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (TAAOM) website has information about upcoming events and governmental affairs relating to the practice of acupuncture, or you can contact them for more information on how you can help.


4. Talk to your acupuncturist.

If your insurance company places restrictions on the acupuncture coverage on your policy (ex. Acupuncture for treatment of pain only, a small number of covered visits per year, etc.) please talk to your acupuncturist. They may be able to help you navigate the confusing world of insurance and acupuncture, and can possibly help you get coverage for additional treatments. If you are a patient of the AOMA Clinics please feel free to contact sowenby@aoma.edu for any help communicating with your insurance company or understanding your benefits.

 

5. Change your insurance policy or company.

If you purchase your own insurance it may be relatively simple for you to change your individual policy, add coverage for acupuncture by purchasing alternative medicine “riders,” or even switch your insurance company. If you receive insurance through your employer, talk to your Human Resources representative to find out if there are different plan types for you to choose from. However, most insurance policies are purchased annually and can only be changed during annual renewal or open enrollment periods.

Introduction to Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine


Topics: Traditional Chinese Medicine, Complementary Medicine, insurance coverage

Stay in touch

Get our blog in your inbox!

Subscribe below to receive instant, weekly, or monthly blog updates directly to your email inbox.

Subscribe to Email Updates

Posts by Topic

see all