AOMA Blog

ED: The Effects and Prospects of Traditional Chinese Medicine

Posted by Jing Fan, LAc on Thu, Aug 18, 2016 @ 03:54 PM

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Erectile dysfunction (ED), defined as the consistent inability to attain or maintain penile erection sufficient for satisfactory sexual performance, has become a global health issue with a high prevalence and considerable impact on the quality of life of sufferers and their partners. In addition, ED may share a common pathologic mechanism with cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndromes, and other endocrine disorders. The cause of ED is complicated and may be divided into three categories: psychogenic causes, organic causes (including endogenous, vascular and drug causes) and mixed causes.

Currently, research focuses on the dysfunction of endothelial cells of the cavernous body of the penis and disordered release of NO. To date, several phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors have been developed. Despite the advances in clinical and basic research which have led to several new options, the ideal treatment of ED has not been identified [12].

TCM has been used to treat sexual dysfunction such as ED in China for more than 2,000 years. Many studies show that TCM treatment could significantly improve the quality of erection and sexual activity of ED patients [13–17]. TCM achieves better regulation, especially with regard to ED patients’ anxiety, fatigability, changing hormonal levels, insomnia, and gastroparesis.

Correct syndrome differentiation (“Bian Zheng”) was the prerequisite for achieving the hoped-for efficacy of TCM for treating ED. Syndrome differentiation is one of the essential characters of TCM. It means analyzing and judging the data obtained from the four diagnostic methods (inspection, auscultation and olfaction, inquiry, and pulse-taking and palpation) so to differentiate the nature, location, and cause of disease. So pattern differentiation is the premise and foundation of treatment. 

In the past, traditional treatments based on syndrome differentiation (an overall analysis of signs and symptoms) placed importance on the kidneys and liver. Herbs and acupuncture points to invigorate qi can enhance physical fitness, and to warm the kidneys can regulate sex hormones, increase sexual drive, invigorate the spleen, regulate the stomach and improve the overall situation. Herbs and acupuncture points used for a stagnated liver provides tranquilisation and helps stabilize the mind, which can improve mental processes and emotional wellness. This treatment can not only increase the effects but also improve the patient’s overall condition and quality of life. More research also shows that using the concepts of integrative Chinese medicine, sexual dysfunction, especially ED with premature ejaculation, should be treated concurrently based on syndrome differentiation of the heart.

This approach does not conflict with the concept of TCM that the heart controls mental activities, blood circulation, and eroticism. Concurrent treatment of the heart and kidneys can coordinate these organs. Thus, the concept of integrated medicine offers a perfect, traditional treatment for erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation.

According to the latest pharmacological research on TCM, many Chinese herbal medicines (e.g., ginseng, epimedium and pilose antler) function as the male sex hormone. According to domestic and international research, ginsenoside and red ginseng extracts can stimulate penis tissue to produce NO and phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors. Additionally, ginsenoside and red ginseng extracts can also regulate the function of sex glands and increase semen volume to reinforce sexuality. Epimedium and Lycium berry can inhibit nitric oxide synthase and are helpful for improving endothelial cell function in the penis and promoting the formation of NO.[18] Research has shown that Chai Hu Shu Gan San can increase the duration of erection in the male rat and can increase NO content in penis tissue. Medicine that promotes blood circulation, such as Tao Ren Si Wu and Jin Kui Shen Qi Wan, can help to regain an erection that was lost or achieve a repeat erection. Therefore, the treatment of ED with TCM has practical effects and is supported by scientific research.

In ED, acupuncture also has shown moderate efficacy, with an early study in 1999 of 16 men with ED treated with twice weekly acupuncture for 8 weeks demonstrating an improvement in erectile function in 39 % of men [19]. The potential mechanism of acupuncture for ED is that it may modulate the nitric oxide related to the treatment of ED [20].

Overall, TCM treatment for sexual dysfunction can not only increase the effects of simultaneous treatments but also improve the patient’s overall condition and quality of life.

Dr. Jing Fan treats at the AOMA acupuncture clinics. Request an Appointment with us today! 

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References:

[1] “Impotence: NIH consensus development panel on impotence,” The Journal of the AmericanMedical Association, vol. 270, no. 1, pp. 83–90, 1993.

[2] I.A.Aytac¸, J. B.McKinlay, and R. J.Krane, “The likely worldwide increase in erectile dysfunction between 1995 and 2025 and some possible policy consequences,” BJU International, vol. 84, no. 1, pp. 50–56, 1999.

[3] R. K. Mutagaywa, J. Lutale, A. Muhsin, and B. A. Kamala, “Prevalence of erectile dysfunction and associated factors among diabetic men attending the diabetic clinic at muhimbili national hospital in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania,” Pan African Medical Journal, vol. 17, article 227, 2014.

[4] J. F. Guest and R. das Gupta, “Health-related quality of life in a UK-based population of men with erectile dysfunction,” PharmacoEconomics, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 109–117, 2002.

[5] A. U. Idung, F. Abasiubong, S. B. Udoh, and O. S. Akinbami, “Quality of life in patients with erectile dysfunction in theNiger Delta region,Nigeria,” Journal ofMentalHealth, vol. 21,no. 3, pp. 236–243, 2012.

[6] R. E. Gerber, J. A. Vita, P. Ganz et al., “Association of peripheral microvascular dysfunction and erectile dysfunction,” The Journal of Urology, 2014.

[7] E. Vicenzini, M. Altieri, P. M. Michetti et al., “Cerebral vasomotor reactivity is reduced in patients with erectile dysfunction,” European Neurology, vol. 60, no. 2, pp. 85–88, 2008.

[8] A. Sai Ravi Shanker, B. Phanikrishna, and C. Bhaktha Vatsala Reddy, “Association between erectile dysfunction and coronary artery disease and its severity,” Indian Heart Journal, vol. 65, no.

2, pp. 180–186, 2013.

[9] K. T. McVary, “Sexual dysfunction,” in Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, A. S. Fauci, E. Braunwald, D. L. Kasper, S. L. Hauser, D. L. Longo, and J. L. Jameson, Eds., chapter 49, section 8, pp. 271–275, McGraw-Hill, Chicago, Ill, USA, 17th edition, 2008.

[10] S. H. Golden, K. A. Robinson, I. Saldanha, B. Anton, and P. W. Ladenson, “Prevalence and incidence of endocrine and metabolic disorders in the united states: a comprehensive review,” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 94, no. 6, pp. 1853–1878, 2009.

[11] J. Buvat, M.Maggi, L. Gooren et al., “Endocrine aspects of male sexual dysfunctions,” Journal of Sexual Medicine, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 1627–1656, 2010.

[12] D. K.Montague, J. Jarow, G. A. Broderick et al., “American urological association guideline on the management of priapism,” Journal of Urology, vol. 170, no. 4, pp. 1318–1324, 2003.

[13] L. S. Yaman, S. Kilic, K. Sarica, M. Bayar, and B. Saygin, “The place of acupuncture in the management of psychogenic impotence,” European Urology, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 52–55, 1994.

[14] P. F. Engelhardt, L. K. Daha, T. Zils, R. Simak, K. K¨onig, and H. Pfl¨uger, “Acupuncture in the treatment of psychogenic erectile dysfunction: first results of a prospective randomized placebo-controlled study,” International Journal of Impotence Research, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 343–346, 2003.

[15] Y. Cui, Y. Feng, L. Chen et al., “Randomized and controlled research of Chinese drug acupoint injection therapy for erectile dysfunction,” Zhongguo Zhen Jiu, vol. 27, no. 12, pp. 881–885, 2007.

[16] W. G.Ma and J. M. Jia, “The effects and prospects of the integration of traditional Chinese medicine andWestern medicine on andrology in China,” Asian Journal of Andrology, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 592–595, 2011.

[17] J. Jiang and R. Jiang, “Molecular mechanisms of traditional Chinese medicine for erectile dysfunction,” Zhonghua Nan KeXue, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 459–462, 2009.

[18] Fu J, Qiao L, Jing TY, Lin GT, Wang YY et al. Effect of icarrin on cGMP levels in penile corous cavernosum of rabbit. Chin Pharmacol Bull 2002; 18: 430–3.

[19] Lee MS, Shin BC, Ernst E. Acupuncture for treating erectile dysfunction: a systematic review. BJU int

2009:104:366-70.

[20] Kho HG, Sweep CG, Chen X, Rabsztyn PR, Meuleman EJ. The use of acupuncture in the treatment of erectile dysfunction. Int J Impot Res. 1999; 11(1)

 

Topics: tcm, men's health

Heart and the Emotional Wellbeing in Chinese Medicine

Posted by Xiaotian Shen on Thu, Feb 11, 2016 @ 03:50 PM

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In modern society, an illness is no longer considered just the problems of the physical aspect of the body. Very often, the emotional state of the patient can be a contributing factor, if not the primary cause, of their illness.

Today we typically believe that the brain commands the emotions and mental activities, but in the tradition of Western culture, the true source of our emotions is deeply rooted in the heart. We say “I love you from the bottom of my heart”, “heart bursting with joy”, “heart is full”, “my heart is broken”, instead of saying “I love you with my brain” or “brain wrenching”, etc. On the surface, the heart of the issue seems to be that in the West we think with our brains, feel with our hearts, and go with our guts. But if we look deep into Western traditions, some similar philosophies to Eastern culture can be found. When people say “know by heart”, or “take it to heart”, we put the heart in charge of the conscious and subconscious awareness in the same way Chinese medicine believes; when people say “heart to heart”, “heart of steel” or “heart of gold”, it suggests people still intuitively identify their sense of self with the heart. In Chinese medicine, the Heart governs both the mind and the spirit, and therefore represents a more holistic and less isolated approach.

While there’s a recognition of biofeedback based upon heart-brain connection in both cultures, the difference in Western and Eastern medicine is that Eastern medicine takes the heart-brain connection, and furthermore the heart-body connection, more seriously. Traditional Chinese medicine in particular uses it in a more practical way within everyday diagnosis and treatment instead of treating the body with medicine, treating the mind with science, and treating the spirit with religion - as is commonly done in modern Western society.  

Heart is considered the monarchy organ in Chinese medicine, which means Heart not only dominates the blood circulation of the body, but also guides our consciousness and awareness, memory and intellect, emotions and mental activities. When the Heart is strong, we sleep soundly, think clearly and have a good memory, and we have balanced emotions and consciousness. When there are disorders in the Heart, we might experience memory and concentration deficiencies, poor sleep, moodiness and even madness in some extreme cases. In Traditional Chinese medicine we tend to look at a person as a complete system and treat both the emotions and the physical body. Consequently, when we treat, we treat the whole person and we put our hearts into it.

According to the Eastern ancient medicine, the positive energy of the Heart is essential to the good health of the entire body. In order to cultivate the energy of the Heart, one should focus on maintaining a positive outlook and worrying less, seeking peace and tranquility being driven by compassion instead of desires, keeping a regular sleep and eating schedule, and exploring nature often.

The foods that are good for the heart are usually red, because the Heart is the fire organ according to the five element theory and the color red corresponds to the fire element too. These foods include red berries, tomatoes and watermelon; some red meat also helps to nourish heart blood, but remember another important principle of Eastern medicine: everything in moderation.

Learn More: Download an Overview of the Master's Program Introduction to Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine

Topics: tcm nutrition, tcm, tcm health, chinese medicine

Acupuncture and TCM for Weight Loss

Posted by Violet Song on Wed, Jan 06, 2016 @ 11:50 AM

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When it comes to New Year's resolutions, weight loss usually takes the cake as being the most popular area of change people wish to make in their lives. From diet fads and pills to intense workout regimens like Insanity and CrossFit, the various ways to lose weight seem endless. Some even take the Western medical route to "fix" their problem areas, opting for costly and risky surgeries or procedures like Botox or Liposuction. What the average American might not realize is that options in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and acupuncture are effective and much safer in comparison.

Measuring Obesity

When talking about weight loss, there are two indexes often used for measurement of weight issues:

1. Body Mass Index

In June 1997, the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Database on Body Mass Index (BMI) was developed as part of WHO's commitment to implementing the recommendations of the WHO Expert.

BMI = WEIGHT (kg) / HEIGHT (m) × HEIGHT (m)

BMI Categories:

Underweight = <18.5

Normal weight = 18.5–24.9

Overweight = 25–29.9

Obesity = BMI of 30 or greater

2. Waist Size

Waist size is the simplest and most common way to measure “abdominal obesity”—the extra fat found around the middle that is an important factor in health, even independent of BMI. It is the circumference of the abdomen, measured at the natural waist (in between the lowest rib and the top of the hip bone), the umbilicus (belly button), or at the narrowest point of the midsection.

Below are the abdominal obesity measurement guidelines for different ethnic groups according to the Harvard School of Public Health:

Country/Ethnic Group

Waist Circumference Cut Points

Europids*

In the USA, the ATP III values

(102 cm male; 88 cm female)

are likely to continue to be used for

clinical purposes

Male: ≥ 94 cm

Female: ≥ 80 cm

South Asians
Based on a Chinese, Malay,

and Asian-Indian population

Male: ≥ 90 cm

Female: ≥ 80 cm

Chinese

Male: ≥ 90 cm

Female: ≥ 80 cm

Japanese**

Male: ≥ 90 cm

Female: ≥ 80 cm

Ethnic South and

Central Americans

Use the South Asian recommendations

until more specific data are available

Sub-Saharan Africans

Use European data until

more specific data are available

Eastern Mediterranean

and Middle East (Arab) populations

Use European data until

more specific data are available

*In future epidemiological studies of populations of Europid origin, prevalence should be given using both European and North American cut points to allow better comparisons.

** Originally, different values were proposed for Japanese people but new data support the use of the values shown above.

How TCM and Acupuncture Can Help 

According to China Knowledge Integrated (CNKI) database in China, there were 74 clinical research papers published between 1994 and 2002 on acupuncture application for weight loss. The effectiveness reached 85%-97%. The acupuncture is targeting both BMI and waist size.

Generally speaking, weight loss acupuncture is used to stimulate the acupoints and meridians. It can help by regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary– adrenal axis and the sympathetic-adrenal medulla systems. Therefore, it accelerates the basal metabolic rate and promotes fat metabolism. When calorie-burning increases, accumulated fat is consumed.

Using acupuncture to regulate and adjust, the human body self-balances. The approach is to stimulate the acupoints in order to strengthen the vital qi (the energetic substance). When the vital qi is strong, pathogenic factors cannot stay in the body. In other words, body fat no longer accumulates.

Benefits of Weight Loss Acupuncture

First, acupuncture can efficiently regulate lipid metabolism. Overweight patients usually have above normal lipid peroxidation. Acupuncture points are used to lower the lipid peroxidation level and accelerate lipid metabolism, thus achieving weight loss.

Second, acupuncture can help correct abnormal food cravings. Acupuncture regulates the nervous system in order to control the excessive gastric acid secretion. After acupuncture, the gastric emptying process slows and food cravings are reduced.

Third, acupuncture can effectively regulate endocrine disorders. Endocrine disorders are often accompanied by weight gain. The most typical endocrine overweight examples are postpartum and menopause related. There are two systems involved: the hypothalamic-pituitary–adrenal axis and the sympathetic-adrenal medulla. Disorders of these two systems are often found in overweight patients.

Besides acupuncture, herbal treatment, dietary regulations, meditation and, most importantly, exercise are all part of a weight loss treatment plan. There are many weight loss methods which we use during clinical practice at AOMA and which your acupuncturist can discuss with you. Acupuncture is a safe choice for weight loss without side effects. The acupuncture treatment regulates the body's internal functions and helps the body return to a normal rate of metabolism. It is not a temporary action, but one that produces long-term benefits.

Request an appointment at the AOMA clinics with Violet Song:

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Download our introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine Nutrition:

Introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Nutrition

Topics: tcm nutrition, tcm, weight loss

Winter Recipes for Optimal Health according to Chinese Medicine Nutrition

Posted by Sarah Bentley on Mon, Dec 01, 2014 @ 10:22 AM

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With the gluttony of Thanksgiving behind us and a just few weeks until the next-biggest eating holidays of the year, maybe it is time to give your body what it is yearning for: nourishment. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) nutrition principles, during the winter months our energy begins to move inward. It is a time of quietude and the best season to tonify and store essence internally. We asked two of our esteemed faculty members to share their favorite recipes for the season. We hope you enjoy!

Winter Tonic Oxtail Soup

Dr. Violet Song recommends this Winter Tonic Oxtail Soup. It is warm in nature and is a great kidney yang tonic. It’s a superb dish for the winter season! Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) calls for “Winter Daikon, Summer Ginger.” Winter cold can bring the coagulation of qi flow in the human body. The oxtail can be so much of a tonic that it can be too greasy, but the daikon can move qi and offset this consistency. The soup can be served 1-2 times per week all through the winter.

tcm nutrition daikon

Ingredients:
1 lb oxtail
1 tbsp cooking wine
Water
1 lb daikon radish
Carrots, greens (optional)
Salt
Cilantro as garnish (optional)

Instructions:
1.    Chop the oxtail into 1-inch cubes.
2.    Put the oxtail cubes into pan with 1 tbsp of cooking wine and 1 cup of water. Boil for 5 minutes.
3.    Strain the liquid and use warm water to wash the oxtail cubes.
4.    Put the washed oxtail cubes in a crock pot with plenty of water (more water, more soup) and stew for 3 hours.
5.    Cut the daikon radish into 1-inch cubes. Add the daikon radish to the crock pot with the oxtail and continue to stew for 1 more hour. You may add other vegetables, like carrots and greens, depending on how long they will take to cook.
6.    Add salt to taste. You may garnish with cilantro.

tcm nutrition oxtail soup

Introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Nutrition

Ginseng and Walnut Congee

Dr. Grace Tan recommends Ginseng and Walnut Congee for a healthy sweet treat in the wintertime. This rice porridge boosts the qi and warms the kidneys. It also calms the spirit and generates moisture in a typically very dry season. It is not suitable for patients with a cold or fever.

nutrition ginseng

Ingredients:
5g ginseng (approximately 1 inch of the root)
½ cup walnuts
2½ cups rice
Water
¼ cup honey


Instructions:
1.    Soak ginseng in water at room temperature until soft. Cut into small pieces. (5g is a good amount if you are just starting to take ginseng, you can gradually increase amount up to 10 or 15g)
2.    Place first four ingredients in a clay pot and add more water. You can also do this in a crock pot, although if you do it overnight, make sure to add extra water.
3.    Bring the pot to the boil on high heat, then reduce the heat and continue to simmer until the soup thickens.
4.    Add honey and continue to simmer until the soup turns into a paste-like consistency.

tcm nutrition walnut congee

Get more traditional Chinese medicine nutrition tips as well as a recipe for each seaon by downloading our TCM guide to nutrition.

acupuncture appointments in Austin

 

Topics: nutrition, tcm nutrition, tcm

Chinese Medicine for Addiction and Recovery

Posted by Sarah Bentley on Mon, Nov 03, 2014 @ 09:58 AM

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Claudia Voyles, LAc, is the founder and director of Remedy Center for Healing Arts, anclaudia voyles, acu detox training acupuncture and psychotherapy practice in south Austin. In her private practice, Claudia typically will treat about 10 patients per week who are recovering persons, as well as others with mental health diagnoses. “The goal of acupuncture is always to restore balance, flow, and maximum functioning.”

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a unique way of assessing physiology and psychology. One fascinating pattern in the assessment of addiction is called "empty fire," the flaring up symptoms, including emotions and behavior due to the loss of a calm center. Treatment then is designed to nourish the Yin aspect, restore balance, and support the recovery process by making the person stronger from the inside. Treatment is appropriate as support throughout the continuum of care, from pre-treatment or harm reduction through aftercare and recovery maintenance (relapse prevention). “‘Addiction’ is not a Chinese medical diagnosis. Sometimes we are supporting the withdrawal process, minimizing the symptoms and cravings. Sometimes we are working on the underlying complaints which can be triggers: stress, anxiety, depression, and/or history of trauma and abuse. People in recovery are eager to manage symptoms of chronic illness without medication whenever possible and often have chronic pain or other imbalances that will undermine their recovery and/or quality of life if not addressed."

The NADA protocol – Acudetox

acupuncture for addictions and recovery

The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) promotes the integration of acudetox, a simple ear acupuncture protocol with appropriate modalities of care. NADA is a not-for-profit training and advocacy organization that encourages community wellness through the use of a standardized auricular acupuncture protocol for behavioral health, including addictions, mental health, and disaster and emotional trauma.

Texas allows a limited set of treatment professionals to cross-train in the NADA protocol. This includes acupuncturists, social workers, licensed professional counselors, psychologists, registered and vocational nurses, chemical dependency counselors, medical doctors, and osteopathic doctors. “Acudetox is not a stand-alone treatment, and in my opinion is best provided by a clinician on a treatment team, not by an independent acupuncturist,” said Claudia.

AOMA Provides Acupuncture at Austin Recovery

nada protocol

Claudia is also a clinical preceptor at AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine in Austin, Texas. She supervises interns at a specialty clinic in behavioral health at Austin Recovery. Claudia is a NADA-Registered Trainer and co-chair or training for the organization. She also conducts continuing education programs at the acupuncture college and in the community.

In early 2014, AOMA interns began providing auricular acupuncture treatments (NADA protocol) at Austin Recovery’s Hicks Family Ranch, a 40-acre, in-patient addiction treatment facility in Buda, Texas. Austin Recovery serves between 800 and 1,000 clients each year, providing individual and group counseling, education about addiction processes, 12-step programs, life skills classes, musical journey experiences, and now acupuncture and Chinese medicine.

AOMA incorporates the NADA training into the Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program. At Austin Recovery, acupuncture students provide acudetox with the treatment staff for 10-25 clients, and then a full-body acupuncture clinic for eight. “We treat withdrawal--usually post-acute with that population--as well as chronic/acute pain, anxiety, stress, insomnia, digestive issues, libido/sexual function issues, etc.,” said Claudia. After a recent acupuncture treatment an Austin Recovery, a patient shared, "I have never breathed so deep before. I didn't realize I wasn't fully breathing." Restoring simple quality of life to recovering persons can be truly transformative.

Natalie Villarreal, a senior acupuncture intern at AOMA, feels very lucky to be able to learn and treat patients at ‘the Ranch’.  “Austin Recovery provides a unique integrative clinic opportunity.  The integrative team encourages a supportive environment, with acupuncturists and social workers working side by side. I love that we can get a better perspective on the experience of our patients through attending classes and meetings that they are going to. This advanced clinic epitomizes the true meaning of integrative medicine.”

Introduction to Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine

Topics: Traditional Chinese Medicine, addiction, recovery, NADA, Claudia Voyles, tcm

Treatment of Menopause with Traditional Chinese Medicine

Posted by Sarah Bentley on Mon, Jul 29, 2013 @ 03:11 PM

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Menopause is the natural termination of the menstrual cycle, lasting from a few months to years. The average woman experiences menopause at approximately 51 years, and it usually occurs between the ages of 40 to 55, at around the same age as the woman’s mother began menopause. Common physical symptoms of menopause include hot flashes, vaginal dryness, night sweats, urinary problems, and headaches. Menopause is also characterized by emotional symptoms such as sudden mood changes, depression, irritability, insomnia, and nervousness.

During this time of hormonal and energy fluctuation, menopausal complications reduce the quality of a woman’s life and result in uncomfortable or even debilitating symptoms. Hormone replacement therapy is the standard Western treatment for menopausal difficulties; however, estrogen supplements have been linked to undesired side effects and increased health risks. Traditional Chinese medicine offers an alternate way to reduce menopausal symptoms through diet, herbal remedies and acupuncture.

Traditional Chinese Medicine Offers an Alternative

According to Chinese medicine, imbalanced interaction between kidney yin and yang leads to difficulties during menopause. The theoretic framework of yin-yang is used to explain aspects of the human body as well as to guide diagnosis and treatment. Women may have yin or yang deficiencies that affect how they experience menopause.

The kidneys are viewed as the central organs responsible for controlling other bodily functions, and kidney yin and yang deficiencies lead to certain associated menopausal symptoms, with different treatment existing for each type. Symptoms of yang deficiency in menopause may include tiredness, lower back pain, incontinence, and aversion to cold. Symptoms of yin deficiency (the far more common type) include hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, and irritability.

Nutrition for Menopausekidney bean

Some common foods that help build yin for yin-deficiency type menopause include wheat germ, mung bean, seaweed, cucumber, millet, black bean, tofu, kidney bean, barley, black sesame seed, and royal jelly. Women should follow a low-fat, high-fiber diet. In addition, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, and reducing stress are all important. Chinese medicine can effectively and quickly treat symptoms such as hot flashes through many herbal formulas, commonly including dang gui (Chinese angelica) and yi mu cao (motherwort). Thus, traditional Chinese medicine can alleviate menopausal symptoms without the risks of hormone replacement therapy.

About the author:

In addition to her thirty years of acupuncture and Chinese herbal experience, Dr. Qiao “Chelsea” Xu has also practiced qigong and yoga over twenty years, utilizing concepts from these practices in her treatments. She offers treatment in pain management, female and digestive disorders, allergies, asthma, and stress. In her spare time, she likes to practice qigong, taiji, and meditation.

Introduction to Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine

Topics: menopause, women's health, Dr. Chelsea Xu, tcm

Traditional Chinese Herbs for the Flu

Posted by Sarah Bentley on Tue, Jan 15, 2013 @ 04:29 PM

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Fu Fang Ban Lan Gen Chong Ji (granule of Isatis root formula) contains Nan ban lan gen (Southern Isatis Root), Pu gong ying (Dandelion), Zi hua di ding (Herba Violae), and cane sugar. It’s primary function is to clear toxic heat, or in lay terms flu symptoms like fever, sore throat, yellow phlegm, etc.traditional chinese herbs for flu

 We often have patients come in with fever and sore throat who see quick improvement after taking this formula. It can also be used preventatively. This formula was used in China when they experienced the SARS outbreak and has become a staple in many household medicine cabinets.

For acute symptoms you should take the formula 3-4 times daily for 1-2 weeks. For prevention, it is best if you can start 1-2 weeks ahead, but definitely as soon as you notice those around you displaying symptoms. Herbal treatment for children can start as young as 3 months old, but they would need to see a licensed practitioner and get a prescription based on age and body weight.

Some brands of Fu Fang Ban Lan Gen Chong Ji are packaged in easy-open, one dosage packets. All you need to do is dissolve the granules in hot water and drink up. Some patients may experience loose stools or poor appetite after taking it.


Written by:

Dr. Violet Song offers acupuncture and herbal treatments for female disorders, stress, insomnia, digestive disorders, the common cold, cough, as well as pediatric herbal consultations.

Learn more about Acupuncture  & Herbal Medicine

 

Topics: Traditional Chinese Medicine, chinese herbalism, herbal medicine, tcm

Pediatric Tuina – Ancient Chinese Massage for Kids

Posted by Sarah Bentley on Wed, Jan 11, 2012 @ 02:10 PM

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I have twin boys, Daniel and Jack. While my smaller one, Jack, was 3 months old, he suffered from colic after breastfeeding almost once a day. When he was in pain, he would cry and his belly would be very tight to the touch. I began to massage his abdomen beside the belly button three to five times on both sides; after a minute or so of loud crying, he would gradually calm down and then immediately fall in sleep. I found this ancient massage technique to be very helpful and after about two weeks of massage combined with Chinese herbs, the colic never returned.

This technique is called “Na Du Jiao” which means “Grasping Belly Corner”, and it is one of the numerous massage techniques of Chinese Pediatric Tuina (traditional massage). Chinese Pediatric Tuina has been applied for over one thousand years in China. Its popularity has grown in the last three to four hundred years.  

pediatric tuinaPediatric massage is applied on specific points of various parts of the body, such as the face, abdomen, back and extremities depending on the disorders. Lotion can be used to protect the skin and ease the treatment. Each session lasts about 20 – 30 minutes. In most cases, the treatment should be given once a day or every other day. Since the pediatric tuina technique is very simple, parents are encouraged to learn and practice some of the major techniques, so they can repeat the treatments at home.  

In Chinese medicine, children are regarded with “pure Yang constitution” which means they grow and develop fast in physique and intelligence. At the same time, they are also “young Yang and Yin constitution” meaning they have imperfect organic function and physical bodies, which is why they get sick easily, especially with digestive and respiratory problems. As a parent, it often seems that stomach aches (bloating, vomiting, nausea, constipation, diarrhea) or colds (coughing, asthma, allergies) as well as bed wetting & night time crying are ubiquitous during childhood.  

Pediatric tuina is a safe manual therapy; it is gentle without side effects and great to relieve most discomforts experienced during childhood. Besides that, it is also excellent at preventing other diseases. Providing regular and simple pediatric tuina for your kids can strengthen their digestive and immune systems and support their natural body constitution. Children who have picky appetites or easily catch colds are great candidates for pediatric tuina. It is most effective for children from birth to seven years old. For older kids, acupuncture is a good combination as well.   A lot of times, a Chinese herbal formula is suggested to be combined to provide even better and faster results. 

Tips for a successful tuina or acupuncture treatment for your child:
  • It’s best if your child doesn’t come to his/her appointment on an empty or full stomach.
  • Plan for your child to take it easy after his/her treatment.
  • Sometimes after receiving an acupuncture treatment your child may feel a little lightheaded or “woozy.” If that is the case, please have him/her sit for a while in our waiting area. In a few minutes he/she will be relaxed and clear-headed.

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Yongxin Fan, LAc has over 20 years of clinical experience in treating muscular-skeletal disorders, pain, digestive disorders, and psycho-emotional disorders.

Topics: pediatrics, Dr. Yongxin Fan, tunia, tcm

Traditional Chinese Medicine: First Aid Kit

Posted by Sarah Bentley on Tue, Jul 26, 2011 @ 01:47 PM

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Looking to incorporate herbs and natural remedies into your regular first aid kit? Chinese herbs have been used for millennia. There are roughly 13,000 medicinals used in China and over 100,000 medicinal recipes recorded in the ancient literature.

Dr. Violet Song, a full-time PhD staff member at AOMA Herbal Medicine, has compiled this list of Chinese herbal remedies to enrich your medicine cabinet. “Often times it is easy to prevent a small problem from developing into a more serious medical situation by incorporating simple Chinese herbs into your home first aid kit,” Dr. Song says. “Chinese herbs work naturally with your body to balance disparities and prevent ailments.”

AOMA Herbal Medicine has a selection of over 350 bulk, powder, patent formulas, tablets, capsules, and extracts. AOMA Herbal Medicine carries only cGMP herbal products.

Common cold

  • Yin Qiao tablet: wind heat type of common cold
  • Gan Mao Ling: clear heat
  • Jing Fang Bai Du Pills: wind cold with dampness (chills, fever, soreness in the body)
  • Gan Mao Jie Du Chong Ji
  • Ban Lan Gen Chong Ji: common cold with severe sore throat
  • White Flower oil: for headache, stuffy nose

Allergies

  • Pe Min Kan Wan: nasal congestion, runny nose

Diarrhea

  • Huang Lian: clear heat

Stomach Flu

  • *Huo Xiang Zheng Qi liquid vial: vomiting, diarrhea, summer heat induced
  • Curing Pills: food poisoning, nausea, diarrhea

Traumatic injury

  • *Yun Nan Bai Yao (oral & topical): stop bleeding and move blood
  • Zheng Gu Shui (topical): tendon and joint pain, sprains, bruises

Burns

  • Chin Wan Hong ointment (topical)

Food stagnation

  • Bao He Wan: indigestion, bloating, acid reflux

Bug Bites

  • White Flower oil (topical)

Motion Sickness

  • *Huo Xiang Zheng Qi liquid vial (oral)
  • White Flower oil (topical)

Warning: If symptoms persist or worsen see a health care practitioner. It is wise to check with your doctor before using herbs, as they may interact with medications you take regularly.

*These formulas require a prescription for a licensed herbalist.

Acupuncture treatments at the AOMA Clinics include an herbal consultation. At the AOMA Professional Clinics you can also specifically request a personalized herbal prescription without the acupuncture part of the treatment. AOMA patient Samantha Robinson has been coming to AOMA for years. "Since becoming a patient at AOMA, I no longer take allergy and asthma drugs, so thankfully, I also don't have the side effects that come with those drugs. At AOMA, the herbs are custom-prescribed for me every time I go in.  When I take herbs, I get good results from them without all of the side effects that Western drugs have."

Both AOMA clinics have herbal apothecaries next door while other area acupuncturists may call in your prescription to our large dispensary at AOMA Herbal Medicine. Chinese herbs are generally much cheaper than western prescriptions. You can use your health savings account to pay for them at AOMA Herbal Medicine!

Introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Nutrition

Topics: chinese herbalism, Dr. Violet Song, chinese herbs, tcm

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