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Scholarships: Funding a Graduate Degree in Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine

  
  
  

The choice to attend graduate school is a major life decision and figuring out how to pay for it is an important step. Most students take out federal loans to pay for acupuncture school and many also work part-time jobs. The most astute students also apply for scholarships.

Each year AOMA awards scholarships to current students. The AOMA scholarship webpage informs students of internal and external scholarship opportunities.

AOMA Scholarships

President's Award - $500 - Deadline: May 15, 2014

The President’s Award is a scholarship awarded by AOMA to a currently enrolled AOMA student in good academic standing. The President seeks to support AOMA students who contribute to the professional community of Chinese medicine through leadership and/or publication. Leadership activities can include involvement with national, state, or student professional associations, or participation in legislative efforts.

Golden Flower Chinese Herbs - $500-1,000 - Deadline: May 15, 2014

Each year, Golden Flower Chinese Herbs generously provides AOMA with scholarship funds.  Two awards are given for overall excellence in Chinese medical studies and six awards are given for excellence in acupuncture studies, herbal studies, biomedical sciences, and clinical internship.

AOMA Scholarship - $250-500 - Deadline: May 15, 2014

The AOMA Scholarship awards are given annually for overall excellence in Chinese medical studies. Recipients are selected based on their AOMA GPA, grades in individual subject areas, financial need, and response to the essay question.

External Scholarships

ABORM Annual Scholarship - $1,000 - Deadline: March 31, 2014

The ABORM Annual Scholarship is awarded annually to a student enrolled in either a Master’s Degree Program or the Doctoral Degree Program. The scholarship is paid upon successful submission and acceptance for publication of an article in the Journal of Chinese Medicine (JCM). The purpose of the ABORM Annual Scholarship is to foster new scholarly inquiry in the field of Oriental Reproductive Medicine & Infertility for publication in the Journal of Chinese Medicine.

Evergreen Hua-Tuo Scholarship - $1,000 gift card - Deadline: TBA, 2014

Evergreen Herbs funds a scholarship to further the development of effective TCM treatment protocols, while inspiring bright and passionate students of Chinese Medicine to research and write in the field. The winner will receive a scholarship in the form of a $1,000 Evergreen Collection Gift card good towards Evergreen herbal formulas. The winning research paper will also be published by Lotus Institute of Integrative Medicine as well as posted to the Evergreen Herbs' website. Five runners-up will also be selected and will receive their choice of Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology or  Chinese Herbal Formulas and Applications by John Chen and Tina Chen.

Mayway Scholarship - Deadline: TBA, 2014

The Mayway Scholarship Program is open to doctorate of acupuncture and Oriental medicine and master's level students who are currently enrolled in an ACAOM–accredited college of Oriental medicine within the United States and who will be attending a college of OM in fall 2013.

Nuherbs Scholarshi - Deadline: April 1, 2014

The nuherbs Co. Scholarship Program awards three yearly scholarships to current enrollees of ACAOM accredited acupuncture schools.
· nuherbs Scholarship: $2,000
· Herbal Times Scholarship: $1,500
· Jade Dragon Scholarship: $1000

Sokenbicha Essay Challenge - $1,000-4,000 - Deadline: TBA, 2014

The Sokenbicha Essay Challenge is a scholarship contest for students of ACAOM approved Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine schools. First prize is a $4,000 scholarship and paid admission into the annual AAAOM Leadership Meeting and Student Conference (includes airfare and hotel). The first place winner will be recognized at the Student Conference during the Student Caucus. Second prize is a $1,000 scholarship. All winning essays will be printed and distributed to AAAOM conference attendees and will also be published on the Sokenbicha Web site.

Standard Process Scholarship - $2,500 - Deadline: June 28, 2014

Standard Process is sponsoring a yearly scholarship fund for our AOMA students who are in their last three terms of their program. The student must have a cumulative GPA of 2.9 or higher, must be between 1 - 3 terms from graduation, have a list of contributions to the acupuncture profession, the college, and the community, provide a letter of recommendation and write a 500-750 word essay.

The Trudy McAllister Fund - $2,000 - Deadline: TBA, 2014

This scholarship program was established to support students who have entered the last phases of their clinical training or who have undertaken post-graduate studies in acupuncture and Oriental medicine and show promise of making significant contributions either to clinical practice and/or to the understanding of the role of traditional Oriental medicine in a modern context.

Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc. Scholarship- $5,000-10,000 - Deadline: TBA

The Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. Scholarship supports educational opportunities for future generations of scientists. The scholarship is to be awarded to undergraduate and graduate students with a declared major of biology, chemistry, biochemistry, or a related life-science field. To qualify for the scholarship, students must have a GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) and be enrolled in an accredited college for university.

Tylenol Future Care Scholarship - $5,000-10,000 - Deadline: May 31, 2014

The Tylenol Future Care Scholarship is available to any student pursuing a career in healthcare. Ten applicants will receive $10,000 in scholarships and thirty applicants will receive $5,000 in scholarships. Visit Tylenol's Facebook page for further information.

Tillman Military Scholar Program - Deadline: March 6, 2014

The Military Scholar Program offers financial assistance to service members, veterans, and their spouses to cover academic and/or living expenses while in school. For more information about the Pat Tillman Foundation and the Tillman Military Scholars program, please visit their website: http://pattillmanfoundation.org/scholars. Members of each class of Tillman Military Scholars represent a rich and diverse set of backgrounds, experiences and ambitions, and were selected based on strong leadership potential and a drive to make a positive impact on others through service.

Additional Scholarship Resources

Sallie Mae's Scholarship Search

Sallie Mae's free Scholarship Search offers access to an award database that contains more than 3 million scholarships worth over 16 billion dollars, and it is expanded and updated daily. For information, please visit the Sallie Mae Scholarship search website.

For more information about scholarships at AOMA, or to make a contribution, please contact the director of financial aid Estella Sears or visit our scholarship page.

Discover the Art \u0026amp\u003B Spirit of Healing: Introduction to Acupuncture \u0026amp\u003B Chinese Herbal Medicine

Alumna Provides Free Acupuncture in Bhottechour, Nepal

  
  
  

Namaste!Acupuncture in nepal

I have had the most amazing past five months living in Nepal providing acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine at a healthcare clinic in a beautiful place called Bhottechour. Through the kindness and generosity of many members both in and out of the AOMA community, I was able to take off on an adventure of a lifetime and help many people in need

 

acupuncture abroadI consider my volunteer service in Bhottechour to be a resounding success. Although I don’t have the exact numbers, I provided well over 600 treatments in the past five months to people with little to no affordable or accessible healthcare options. These treatments ranged from knee pain and general body aches from working long hours in the fields, to varicose veins, hypertension, stroke recovery, high uric acid levels, allergies, various unknown pathologies, and more. I witnessed people who experienced pain for years become 90-100% pain free in just two to five treatments. The smiles and appreciation were abundant.   

 

As a member of the clinic staff, I got to engage in the day to day environment of the local people. I woke up to an amazing mountain view. I ate delicious traditional Nepali food consisting of a heaping plate of rice, a medley of spicy vegetables, and dal, a type of lentil “soup”. All of this I ate using only my right hand and with the unfettered joy of a child who plays with their food.

 

I took pride in my hand washed clothes and ability to use the restroom in a non-western toilet. My showers were few and far between, but I know my cleanliness was still greater than that of many of my patients.

 

Eventually, I learned enough Nepali to be able to get through a rough version of a patient intake without the use of my translator. And I finally became accustomed to the randomness of electricity availability.

 

amy Babb nepalSome of my most favorite moments were simply lying in the grass outside the clinic with other members of the staff just watching. We saw the millings of a small village where either a motorcycle or a bus passing was a rare event. People carried heavy loads on their backs full of grains and grasses to feed their buffalo and goats. Some stopped into the little shop at the end of our hill to enjoy a cup of tea and catch up on local affairs. We watched the neighbors plowing their fields by day and enjoying a campfire by night. Mostly, we just watched the view of the still mountains and the clouds drifting in the sky. 

 

The air was clean and the daily activity simple. As the clinic is a 24 hour emergency facility, it was an environment where anything and nothing could happen in a day. Planning and expectation took on a whole new meaning. I fell in love with my friends and patients and all the dogs that followed me home. 

 

amy Babb acupunctureThe second part to my Nepal saga is manifesting daily. I now live full-time in Kathmandu with my partner in crime. We watch our future unfolding and we are constantly in awe. Currently, I have Sheng Zhen Gong classes to teach, acupuncture treatments to give, meditations and teachings to enjoy and spiritual practices of Tibetan medicine to research. I think it’s going to be great!  

 

May each of you enjoy those things that fill your heart and free your mind!

From Nepal with Love,
Amy Babb, LAc, MAcOM
AOMA Class of 2012

 
Watch this short video of Amy talking about her experience.

Discover the Art \u0026amp\u003B Spirit of Healing: Introduction to Acupuncture \u0026amp\u003B Chinese Herbal Medicine

Alumni Success: Wally Doggett, Class of 2004

  
  
  

Wally DoggettWally Doggett, owner of South Austin Community Acupuncture and 2004 AOMA alumni moved to Austin in the 80’s from Richmond, Texas to live the musicians’ dream.  The seeds for Chinese medicine were planted in his teenage years by an older musician friend but did not bloom till many years later.  The two would discuss all types of ideas including Asian philosophies and religion.  He began his journey in Austin working at a biotech company running their shipping department during the day and playing drums at honky-tonk bars at night.  He was also participating in qigong at the Keishan Institute.  A profound shift and deep healing happened when the institute brought Praveeta Rose (also an AOMA alumna) and Ward Tummins to talk about various theories in medicine.  As Wally states this lecture spurred him to, “take off after Chinese medicine as if my life depended on it.”  

South Austin Community Clinic has been open since 2006 and was developed while Wally was researching “acupuncture marketing” on the internet.  Wally says, “When I stumbled upon Working Class Acupuncture about four pages into a Google search …the pieces fell into place.”  He immediately booked a trip to Portland to meet Lisa Rohleder, the founder of Working Class Acupuncture, and check out her movement for community acupuncture.  Already feeling connected to his neighborhood in South Austin it was apparent to him that Austin could support a much broader market for acupuncture than charging $60+ per treatment.  Wally wanted to reach as many people as possible with this medicine and it was clear that this was the model to support his vision.  Now he says, “The diversity of people that come though the clinic is one of the most satisfying parts about my work.”

While in school Wally worked at Allen Cline and James Phillip’s clinic Turtle Dragon.  It was here that he was able to work with raw herbs and fill herbal prescriptions.  He learned a lot from this experience including the confidence to make herbal formulations a large part of his current practice.  Wally says, “I value my training at AOMA and my experiences at Turtle Dragon too much not to use Chinese herbal medicine as an integral part of my practice.”

When reflecting on his time at AOMA he remembered the rich experiences he had with professors in conversations between the breaks.  He said, “You just never know when or where someone is going to drop an extraordinary pearl of wisdom that will just connect the dots for you in a profound way.”  Wally has found that it has worked for him to follow his bliss and create his business based on what was most appealing to him.  His advice for current students is to “Follow your heart.  Find a way of working that resonates with you, and pour yourself into it.”  This philosophy has worked for him for more than five years.  He has also expanded to support two other AOMA graduates, Mike Sobin and Erica Chu.

When Wally is not busy with the clinic he is working as the president of Texas Association of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (TAAOM) as of May 2012.  Being in this position, he has been able to make a stronger alliance between the different styles of acupuncture such as community style acupuncture and other more mainstream models.  Wally says, “It is an honor to serve as a board member, and just as I enjoy the diversity of my patient population as a practitioner, one of the more satisfying pieces to me about being president of the TAAOM is the diversity of practitioners, and getting to know them all.”

 

Discover the Art \u0026amp\u003B Spirit of Healing: Introduction to Acupuncture \u0026amp\u003B Chinese Herbal Medicine

Acupuncture & Integrative Pain Care Round-table Discussion, March 21

  
  
  

On Friday March 21st, AOMA will sponsor a round-table discussion about the role of acupuncture & Oriental medicine (AOM) in integrative pain care. Licensed acupuncturists can earn one free Continuing Acupuncture Education (CAE) credit (*pending) by attending.

Speakers will identify challenges within AOM research, integrative practice & pain care, and discuss opportunities for advanced clinical practice. Speakers include Dr. John Finnell, Dr. Daniel Weber, and Dr. Rosa Schnyer.

 

describe the imageJohn Finnell, ND, MPH, LAc

Dr. John Finnell is an accomplished researcher and skilled health care practitioner with a rich academic and professional background. In addition to being an active practitioner of naturopathic & Chinese medicines, he has completed a post-doctoral fellowship with the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), and served as the acting Director of Research for the True North Health Foundation. He is currently the Director of the Doctor of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine (DAOM) program at AOMA.

 

Integrative OncologyDaniel Weber, PhD, MSc

Daniel Weber is a pioneer in complementary medicine committed to fostering dialogue between all types of health care professionals. His extensive academic history spans over 3 decades and includes in-depth study in Japan, the UK, and China. In addition to serving as the vice-chair of the oncology section of the World Federation of Chinese Medical Societies, he is a Visiting Professor at TianJin University, and President of Panaxea International. His research is conducted at Guang 'Anmen hospital in Beijing and at TianJin Unversity.

 

Schnyer RosaRosa Schnyer, DAOM, LAc

Dr. Rosa Schnyer has two decades of clinical research experience and is a leading figure in the development of methodologies for the study of acupuncture & Oriental medicine. She is a faculty member within AOMA's Doctor of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine Program as well as UT Austin's College of Pharmacy & School of Nursing. She maintains an active clinical practice in Austin, Texas and has completed extensive training in both Toyo-Hari Japanese Acupuncture and acupuncture treatment for pain management.

 

Attendees will have the opportunity to present questions to the panel and participate in this important discussion about the future of acupuncture research & integrative pain care. Information about AOMA’s doctoral program, which has a clinical specialty of pain management and the accompanying psychosocial concerns, will also be available.

In addition to the engaging discussion with one free CAE credit, participants may also receive 10% off the registration cost of Dr. Daniel Weber’s Integrative Oncology CE Workshop on Saturday March 22.

Join us in the dialogue that will shape the advancement of TCM.

Friday, March 21:
7:30pm – 8:30pm - Roundtable Discussion
8:30pm – 9:15pm - Questions, Comments, and Cocktails

 

New Call\u002Dto\u002DAction

Chinese Medicine: Why do we get colds when it gets cold?

  
  
  

Upper respiratory infections such as colds or the influenza virus are prevalent during the cold months of the year, but can be caught all year round. Typical symptoms are headache, coughing, sore throat, stuffy and running nose and body aches.

Pores are the windows of your body

During hot climate seasons like summer, the pores of our skin are wide open. These pores on our skin are like the windows of our body. They can help with releasing the heat from our body and promoting sweating. When the weather gets cold, our body starts to close these ‘windows’ entirely, so it can prevent the external wind and cold from entering. The process of these windows closing, however, is slow and adjusted according to the weather changes. Therefore, if the temperature suddenly drops and the windows are still open, we’re easily vulnerable to a wind-cold pathogenic factor attacking us.

Releasing the Exterior

Acupuncture has been used for thousands of years to help enhance the immune system and ward off illness. Its immunostimulating functions treat all types of upper respiratory infections -- including colds -- effectively, achieving a quick recovery without side effects. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) views colds and flus as pathogenic invasions that can easily be expelled using certain treatment points and herbs. This is called “releasing the exterior” in TCM.

Why do some people easily catch colds, but others not so often? In biomedicine, we often say those people who have strong immune systems are less likely to catch cold. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, we say these people have strong defensive Qi (or wei qi). Their body has a quick adjustment to the environmental changes around them. In other words, they can close their windows faster, allowing their body surface to be sealed so wind-cold pathogens have no chance to get in.

When a wind-cold pathogen enters our body, it causes sneezing, itchy eyes, runny nose, body aches, and headaches. That’s when we say, “You caught a cold.” In this case, your acupuncturist would recommend some pungent herbs to help the body expel the wind-cold pathogen. For example: ginger, onion and peppermint are the most commonly used herbs in herbal teas for common cold. 

Take a Ginger Bathchinese herbs ginger

A ginger bath can be very soothing and therapeutic when you are coming down with or already have a cold. Again, this helps to “release the exterior” and expel the pathogen. Take a large ginger root and let it boil in a pot of water until the water turns golden in color. Pour this into your hot bath and soak. You can also drink a cup of the ginger tea while you take the bath.

If caught in the early stages, especially within the first few hours of the onset of symptoms, acupuncture, herbal medicine, and qigong can be very effective at eliminating pathogens. Once illness has progressed beyond the early stages, Chinese medicine can be used as symptomatic relief and adjuvant therapy.

Chinese Herbal Remedies for Colds

In the process of treating immunity, Chinese medicine also transports nutrients, improves circulation, balances the body, supports vital energy, and assists your body in maintaining its natural healthy state on its own. Several clinical studies have demonstrated that Chinese medicine reduces the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections and shortens the course of illness.

The Traditional Chinese Medicine herbal remedy most often used for people with weak defensive qi is called Jade Windscreen Formula. It contains:

Radix Astragali Membranacei (Huang Qi)

Radix Saposhnikoviae Divaricatae (Fang Feng)

Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae (Bai Zhu)  

It is suggested to take the formula 1-3 months before the cold season comes to help prevent the onset of the common cold and strengthen the defensive qi. While most Chinese herbal remedies require a prescription, there are certain brands that make the Jade Windscreen Formula that you can get without one.

 

Introduction to Acupuncture \u0026amp\u003B Herbal Medicine

 

 

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