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The Art of Jing Nuan Wu at AOMA Campus and Clinics

  
  
  

A visitor to the AOMA campus and clinics may notice the beautiful art that graces many hallways and rooms.  Most of these striking images were created by Dr. Jing Nuan Wu, and donated  by a current AOMA student who was also a student of Dr. Wu’s.

Jing Nuan Wu (1933-2002) was an artist and acupuncturist who practiced in the Washington, DC area for thirty years. Wu considered his art an extension of his healing practice and a new medium for the application of the theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Inspired by the Wu Xing (Five Phases), an ancient Taoist theory concerning the balancing powers of color and imagery, Wu created paintings and sculptures to promote individual and collective healing. His work became a form of “visual acupuncture”.

Dr. Wu’s art is a new medium for the application of the theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine.  As early as the first medical literature in China, which is 4,000 years ago, there is the idea that taste, sound, color and imagery can be used to promote healing or “getting into harmony”. Inspired by this idea, Dr. Wu creates paintings and sculpture to promote individual and collective healing. His art is a tool for accessing the multiple inner realms and deep connections of our own body, mind and spirit. The healing colors and images help us adjust to the energy and workings of the external world.

“I attempt with my art to change the clockwork of our inner being to the most
beneficial and health inducing rhythm.  When reset and unburdened from the tics of
anxiety and social pressure, one’s being enters a calm field where new patterns of
behavior can develop and take hold within. These quiet inner fields are my
new medical country and my artwork is the way of passage.”

Of major significance in his paintings and sculpture is the yin and yang duality of all things in existence. A sense of balance must bind contrasting opposites or their dynamic relationship will be disrupted.  Likewise, harmony in an individual must be maintained for health to be maintained.  Rather than vanquishing illness, the goal of Chinese medicine is to foster the balance necessary for permanent health within the context of constant change that is the world.  If one does not work internally and externally with the forces of life, illness will occur.

Before he died Dr. Wu requested that his art be displayed in healing spaces.  The original canvas of The Hidden Cure is on permanent loan to the National Institutes of Health. The AOMA student who gifted these prints to AOMA knows Dr. Wu would be happy to have his artwork within a Chinese medicine school and clinics.

Here is a virtual tour of the artwork and their locations at AOMA.

CHIRON’S FEE
Location:  South Clinic

chiron's fee

Chiron’s Fee was inspired by a dream vision.  This painting honors two great healers, one from China and one from Greece.  The central image of a coin blends symbols from the East and the West and represents the fusion of heaven and earth.  The intent is that the possessor of this image will always have the provisions for medical care.     

THREE CINNABAR FIELDS
Location:  Library

three cinnabar fields

Chinese medicine holds that there are three forces that interact in a continuing dynamic.  Externally these forces are heaven, man and earth represented by the bands of purple (also associated with the brain), red (also associated with the heart) and gold (also associated with the stomach).  A multi-colored circle of qi - the energy that flows through everything in the universe - links the three forces together.  When they resonate in harmony and the qi is free-flowing and balanced, health is predominant.  When they are in disharmony and the qi is unbalanced, illness occurs.

A DIALOGUE IN THE MOUNTAINS
Location:  Mind-Body Center

dialogue in the mountains

This painting was inspired by the poetry of the Ancient Chinese Philosopher, Li Po.

You ask me why I live among the green mountains?

I laugh and answer not – my heart is at peace.

Like the peach blossoms in yonder brook, I flow away calmly...

‘Tis another sky and earth, not the world of man.

HEALING WATER AND THE ICE DRAGONS
Location:  South Clinic

healing waters and the ice dragons

Water, associated with dragons in Chinese theory, is the most magical substance on earth.  In its softest state it can overcome the hardest metal. This painting is a reminder of the transformative powers of an element that is the largest part of us.

JADE EMPEROR’S COSMIC FLOWERS
Location:  South Clinic

jade emperor%27s cosmic flowers

The ancient Chinese pictograph for emperor was the flower; a divine creation nurtured by the perfect balance of heaven, earth, sun and water.  The different colors symbolize the cosmic spectrum within which all life is sustained.

Bright green represents the restoring powers of spring to renew the body and its energies.  After a tiring lecture, a long day at the office, a drive on a busy highway   or an illness, meditating on the color green, like the simple act of walking on a green lawn, or watching and listening to the leaves of trees stimulates the body to a sense of restored vitality and wholeness.  

MOON IN DREAMS
Location:  Building E

moon in dreams

In Chinese philosophy, human beings are intimately connected with the moon.   This galactic landscape, outside the boundaries of the known, where possibilities expand and miracles happen, represents the divine universe within each of us.

NOTOGINSENG
Location:  South Clinic

notoginseng

A visual interpretation of Notoginseng, one of the most important and mysterious herbs in Chinese medicine used to treat physical trauma and blood disorders.

THE RED PHOENIX
Location:  Building B

red phoenix

This print was inspired by the ancient legend of the phoenix.  It is meant to evoke the powerful dynamic of rebirth and magical transformation.  In Daoist Shamanic rituals, red is used to benefit sadness and isolation as well as troubles with the heart or small intestine.    

THE HIDDEN CURE
Location:  Building D & North Clinic

the hidden cure

This painting is part of a series of images meant for use in combination with meditation to create balance and good health.  Beneath the amber mask of polyurethane and gold spray is an ancient Taoist talisman for healing.   It symbolizes the enormous power we all have within us to generate our own harmony and well-being.  Blue is a color that can be used especially in combination with meditation to reveal the inner qualities of our being.  It is associated with calm and strength, and helps to dispel worry and fear.

BLUE MOUNTAINS AND DRAGONS
Location:  North Clinic

blue mountains and dragons

In Chinese philosophy, mountains in the highest places in the natural world, symbolize heaven.  The heavens are inhabited by the dragons of rain which, when collected at the base of the mountains, form vapors that fly back up to the top of the mountains.  This free-flowing cycle evokes the interconnected nature of all things that, when kept in harmony, promotes good health and well-being.

TCM for Insomnia: Sleep Better with Acupuncture and Herbs

  
  
  

Insomnia is often not used to refer to a disease or condition, but rather a sympsleep photo cdctom of several sleep disorders.  According to Western medicine, there are two types of insomnia, primary and secondary.  Primary insomnia is not directly related to any other health problems whereas secondary insomnia is difficulty sleeping due to another issue such as asthma, pain, arthritis, cancer, depression or due to a side effect of a medication.

Common symptoms associated with insomnia include difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, waking too early in the morning and feeling tired upon waking. Insomnia is also categorized based on the duration of the symptoms.  

Episodes of insomnia may occur naturally from time to time, but when the condition continues for some time it can become pathological and sets off a whole cascade of events. Acute insomnia is short term and may last for a few nights to several weeks. Chronic insomnia is defined as having symptoms at least three nights per week for one month.

How Is Insomnia Treated with Chinese Medicine (TCM)?

Chinese medicine and acupuncture have been used to treat insomnia for thousands of years. TCM recognizes the proper flow of Qi of the body to be influential in healthy sleep.  We look at the underlying issues causing sleep disturbances such as pain, stress and anxiety or night sweats and work to eliminate these issues.  

An ancient Chinese physician, Zhang Jing-Yue, wrote: “Sleep is yin and ruled by the spirit. If the spirit is quiet there will be sleep. If the spirit is not quiet there is no sleep.” TCM theory begins with the theory of yin yang. Most basically, Yang is associated with day, activity and wakeful hours. Yin is associated with night, stillness and sleep. The spirit, or ‘Shen’ in Chinese, is a combination of the heart and mind; the two are inseparable in Chinese medicine.

Insomnia, often associated with disturbances of the psyche, will affect the state of the heart. The spirit is quiet when anchored by the yin. When the yin is deficient, or the yang energy overactive, the spirit has nowhere to rest. Yin is the energy responsible for night time and sleep and if our bodies are depleted in yin energy we experience insomnia, often with night sweats and a host of other symptoms. With the TCM treatment of insomnia, there is also a strong focus on the health of the kidneys and the balance of the fluids of the body.

herbs for sleepPractitioners of Chinese Medicine treat insomnia by taking into consideration your overall balance of mind, body, and spirit. The condition may be treated using acupuncture, herbal remedies, diet and lifestyle changes, and relaxation techniques. Treatment will be highly individualized and will depend on the underlying cause of the insomnia, which will be differentiated by your practitioner. A proper diagnosis is key to successfully treating insomnia, which may be caused by a number of factors including physical strain, mental and emotional stress, or improper diet. All these things must be examined in the patient’s life and adjusted to increase their state of balance. This will be different for each person and tailored to fit their specific needs. Patients with insomnia often have deeply relaxing treatments and fall asleep during their sessions.

Western science has recognized acupuncture's effects on insomnia and attributes it to the natural release of melatonin and dopamine with acupuncture. Read an article about curing insomnia with acupuncture here: http://www.bulletproofexec.com/how-to-cure-insomnia-with-acupuncture/.

If you are suffering from insomnia you can start by working to eliminate stress and worry from your life. Acupuncture can help you begin to do this by identifying factors that trigger these emotions and take steps to reduce these triggers. Chinese medicine practitioners can also help you manage and reduce your emotional stress and reduce your dependence on sleeping pills or stimulants like smoking, alcohol, coffee or tea, all of which can affect your sleeping patterns. A bit of physical activity each day will help further reduce stress and regulate the flow of blood throughout the body. Practices such as taiji, qigong, and meditation can also help to calm the mind.

For a complete consultation, individual diagnosis and treatment for insomnia, visit our request an appointment page to schedule with a licensed practitioner.

 

Chinese Medicine School: Basic Five Element Theory

  
  
  

7 chakras elementsThe theory of the natural elements is an enduring philosophy across cultures, appearing in separate countries in vastly different eras around the world.

The ancient Greeks used the five elements of earth, water, air, fire, and “aether” (quintessence/spirit) as a guiding principal to better understand the universe. Both ancient Egyptians and Buddhists understood the elements as fire, water, air, and earth. Hinduism utilizes the five elements (earth, water, fire, wind, and “aether”) as well. In fact, the seven chakras pair with Hindu and Buddhist five element theory. Western astrology also makes use of the four classical elements in astrological charting.

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), Five Element theory (also called Wu Xing) is a powerful, foundational lens through which medicine, our bodies, and the world at large can be viewed. Fire, Earth, Metal, Water, and Wood are understood to be the Five Elements in TCM.

Each element is awarded a number of characteristics and correspondences. They all have their separate natures, movements, directions, sounds, times of the day, and much more. Similar to Yin Yang theory, many specific aspects of life and the world can be attributed to a certain element.

In addition to these basic qualities, the elements also correspond with certain internal organs, tastes, emotions, and sense organs in Traditional Chinese Medicine—a very important feature of the theory with great implications to the medicinal practice.

Below are the Five Elements and their commonly discussed and widely held attributes.

Fire

  • Season: Summer
  • Direction: South
  • Color: Red
  • Environment: Hot
  • Taste: Bitter
  • Emotion: Joy
  • Organs: Heart; Small Intestine
  • Sense Organ: Tongue
  • Bodily Tissue: Blood vessel

Earth

  • Season: Late summer
  • Direction: Center/Middle
  • Color: Yellow
  • Environment: Damp
  • Taste: Sweet
  • Emotion: Worry
  • Organs: Spleen; Stomach
  • Sense Organ: Mouth
  • Bodily Tissue: Muscles

Metal

  • Season: Fall
  • Direction: West
  • Color: White
  • Environment: Dry
  • Taste: Pungent
  • Emotion: Grief
  • Organs: Lung; Large Intestine
  • Sense Organ: Nose
  • Bodily Tissue: Body hair

Water

  • Season: Winter
  • Direction: North
  • Color: Black
  • Environment: Cold
  • Taste: Salty
  • Emotion: Fear
  • Organs: Kidneys; Urinary Bladder
  • Sense Organ: Ear
  • Bodily Tissue: Bone

Wood

  • Season: Spring
  • Direction: East
  • Color: Green
  • Environment: Windy
  • Taste: Sour
  • Emotion: Anger
  • Organs: Liver; Gallbladder
  • Sense Organ: Eye
  • Bodily Tissue: Tendons

 

five elementsIn TCM, the Five Elements are dynamic: they create, control, and constantly interact with each other.  Each element is said to generate—give rise—to another element. This generating sequence is a type of “mother-son” relationship, where the parent gives life to and nurtures the child. In Five Element theory, Fire generates Earth. Earth generates Metal. Metal generates Water. Water generates Wood. Wood generates Fire. One jumping off point for remembering this sequence is to think of how rubbing twigs (ie: wood) together can create fire.

Additionally, each element controls and is controlled by another element, creating a system of checks and balances. Ideally, this system guarantees that one element will not over-dominate another element for any lengthy period of time. The controlling sequence is as follows: Fire controls Metal. Metal controls Wood. Wood controls Earth. Earth controls Water. Water controls Fire. An easy way to begin memorizing the controlling relationships is to think of how water can easily douse—control—fire.

Disturbances in these natural generating and controlling orders give rise to pathological symptoms. For instance, if the Wood element is too excessive in the body it may begin “over-controlling” the Earth element. This is a common pathology in clinical practice. One way it can be used is to understand why feeling excessively angry (Wood’s emotion) can give one a stomachache (the Stomach is one of Earth’s organs).

These symptoms are intricately analyzed in AOMA’s didactic classes and utilized to great effect in clinical settings. Even without going into the depth required in Chinese medicine school, however, Five Element theory can provide structure to our daily lives, an understanding of the interconnectedness of our planet, and a richer appreciation of our bodies. Put simply, the Five Elements can be seen as a natural law of the universe.  

Watch Free Video: How Acupuncture Works

 

About the author: Carly Willsie enjoys putting Yin Yang theory into practice as an acupuncture school student and tutor. Carly grew up on a dairy farm in upstate New York and has a background in journalism and publishing.

Chinese Medicine School: Basic Yin Yang Theory

  
  
  
The introductory tenets of Yin and Yang are among the first subjects AOMA students learn in Chinese medicine school. The theory is one of the foundational principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine and its elegant wisdom guides students throughout their years at AOMA and acupuncture school.

When we hear the phrase “Yin and Yang” many of us may first think of the Yin Yang symbol so ubiquitous on key chains, college posters, childhood doodles, and t-shirts throughout the country. The theory of Yin and Yang is much more profound than an image on an old t-shirt may lead you to first believe, however.  This ever-present symbol is called the Taijitu. It’s the universal symbol for the theory of Yin and Yang and of Taoism.

Yin and Yang can initially be understood as darkness and light. Yin (the black part of the Taijitu) is the “shady side of the mountain,” while Yang (the white portion of the Taijitu) is classically referred to as the “sunny side.” From here, we can attribute many characteristics to either a Yin category or a Yang category. Some of the more common examples of Yin and Yang include:  

Yin:
  • Nighttime
  • Fall and Winteryin yang_chinese medicine school
  • Female
  • Right
  • Cold
  • North and West
  • Darkness
  • Substance
  • Slow
  • Wet
  • Lower part of the body
  • Front of the body
  Yang:
  • Daytime
  • Spring and Summer
  • Male
  • Left
  • Warm
  • South and East
  • Light
  • Energy
  • Fast
  • Dry
  • Upper part of the body
  • Back of the body

Yin and Yang

Though Yin and Yang can be understood individually, they cannot exist separately. They might seem like opposites—and do typically represent two different sides of one coin—but their properties are actually complementary and dependent on one another.

This indivisibility is a central aspect of Yin and Yang. Without Yin, Yang cannot exist. Without Yang, Yin is not present. Yin and Yang are inseparable; just as we cannot have only sunny days throughout the year, we will not only have cloudy either.

Another important element in Yin Yang theory is the concept that Yin and Yang can change into one another. Clouds can give way to sun in the same way that Yin can be transformed into Yang. Within Yin, the seed of Yang exists; within Yang, Yin is always present. This dynamic balance between Yin and Yang is represented in the Taijitu symbol by the small circle of opposite color within each half.

As a consequence of this nature, Yin and Yang can be divided infinitely. For instance, we might say that a cloudy day is Yin while a sunny day is Yang. However, we can divide the cloudy day into Yin parts (the nighttime of the cloudy day, as an example) and Yang parts (the morning of the cloudy day). We can then further divide the Yang (morning) part of the cloudy day into Yin and Yang, and so on.

Yin and Yang is a theoretical way to understand the natural dualities present in our world, our relationships, and within ourselves. The simple wisdom gained through an understanding of Yin and Yang enriches our lives and constantly reveals itself in our medicine and personal experiences.

Applying the theory of Yin and Yang to our everyday living is simple and rewarding. Recognizing the natural ebb and flow of our world will allow you a comfort in your current circumstances and in your future, while providing an illuminating viewpoint from which to see our Yin and Yang world.

About the author:

Carly Willsie enjoys putting Yin Yang theory into practice as an acupuncture school student and tutor. Carly grew up on a dairy farm in upstate New York and has a background in journalism and publishing.

Free Video: Yin & Yang Theory in Chinese Medicine Learn More: Download an Overview of the Master's Program  

 

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