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Traditional Chinese Medicine for Children - Video

  
  
  

Yaoping 'Violet' Song, PhD discusses the Traditional Chinese Medicine theory of pediatric health. Dr. Song gives practical ways to improve your child's health.



Prior to beginning her employment with AOMA, Dr. Song worked as an instructor at Chengdu University, lecturing on the science of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) prescriptions & TCM herbology since 2005 and on TCM pharmacology since 2002. She has participated in research studies investigating the compatibility, pharmacology, and toxicology of TCM formulas and Chinese ethnic medicine, including Tibetan medicinal herbs.



Dr. Song has also participated in research grants from the National Science Foundation of China. After graduated from the Chengdu University of TCM, Dr. Yaoping Song continued to practice acupuncture and Chinese medicine by following Professors Xunlun Zhou (expert on herbal formulas) in TCM internal medicine fields. Dr. Song has been on faculty at AOMA since 2008.



Dr. Song offers treatments for female disorders, stress, insomnia, digestive disorders, the common cold, cough, as well as pediatric herbal consultations.

 


Traditional Chinese Medicine Approach to Nutrition: Eat What You Need

  
  
  

tcm nutritionOur society is bombarded with the latest designer diet every day. There are so many ways to approach the topic of healthy eating: multi-vitamins, probiotics, fiber, etc. But are all these supplements and foods appropriate for your body? What does your body really need?

A holistic philosophy, like the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) approach to nutrition, would be to listen to what your body is asking for and not to subscribe to advertisements or trendy diets. Eat what YOU need. But how do you know the difference in what you need and what you crave?

 

Body types

There are many unique body types according to traditional Chinese medicine. This isn’t the same as eating right for your blood type (possibly another trend). Simply put, what may be healthy for your friend may not really be the best nutrition for your body or your digestion. Take fiber as an example: people suffering from constipation need to eat lots of green leafy vegetables. But too much fiber would not be good for someone who has loose stools or even worse, suffers from something like ulcerative colitis, or bloody stools. See recommendations for colitis below.

So, how can you find out what your body type is? Do you run cold or hot? Do you have a tendency towards constipation or loose stools? Are you overweight or underweight? These are a few of the factors in defining your unique body type or constitution. It is recommended to contact a licensed acupuncturist for a consultation.

 

What foods do I need?

How can you find out what types of foods are best for you? Through a comprehensive medical history questionnaire, and tongue and pulse diagnosis, TCM practitioners strive to determine the differentiation pattern of each person to make a unique treatment plan and dietary recommendations. Depending on the diagnosis, a TCM practitioner can suggest foods based on the treatment for these TCM patterns.

For instance, many hypertension cases can have the differentiation pattern of hyperactive Liver yang. Suggested foods would be those that help to clear heat and reduce hyperactive yang. Someone with high blood pressure (caused by hyperactive Liver yang) would do well to drink a cup of juice made from fresh celery and tomato every morning. Of course, there are many other food recommendations for hypertension. For more about TCM treatment of hypertension, read our previous blog post.

 

Healing with Whole Foods

Many practitioners of Chinese medicine would agree that Paul Pitchford’s Healing with Whole Foods is considered the bible of TCM nutrition and use it as a resource. You can look up the properties of specific foods along with recipes for the foods. The book also addresses seasonal and environmental connections according the TCM philosophy, organ systems, disease syndromes, and recommendations for chronic imbalances.

Here’s an excerpt from the book about colitis and enteritis:

These inflammations of the colon and small intestine can be generated by emotional repression and the related energy stagnation of the liver…Typical symptoms of intestinal inflammation include abdominal pain and cramping, diarrhea, and rectal bleeding in severe cases. Because food is not being properly absorbed, there is often weight loss and weakness.

In intestinal inflammations of all types, chewing food well breaks it down better so that it is less irritating, stimulates proper pancreatic secretion, and provides well-insalivated complex carbohydrates which as like a healing salve on the intestinal coating. Raw food is not tolerated because it easily irritates delicate surfaces of inflamed intestines. Many of the symptoms of enteritis and colitis can be caused by dairy intolerances, which are sometimes merely intolerances to the poor quality of the dairy products used.

At this point Pitchford refers to a section of the book on dairy recommendations which include:

  • Full fat milk (avoid low-fat dairy)

  • Goat’s milk is preferred

  • Raw milk (if available)

  • Soured and fermented products: yogurt, kefir, buttermilk, etc

  • Avoid homogenized milk

 

Simple idea: Listen to your body.

With so many mixed messages in the media about the “miracle” diet, it’s not a wonder that we are confused about what to eat. By following some simple ideas based on a holistic approach to nutrition and listening to your body, you can discover what your body really needs to thrive as YOU.

Author: Dr. Violet Song’s medical practice focuses on female disorders, stress, insomnia, hormonal disorders, respiratory diseases, facial acupuncture, as well as pediatric herbal consultations. She also has a passion for dietary and Chinese herbal consultations.



Traditional Chinese Medicine: First Aid Kit

  
  
  

Looking to incorporate herbs and natural remedies into your regular first aid kit? Chinese herbs have been used for millennia. There are roughly 13,000 medicinals used in China and over 100,000 medicinal recipes recorded in the ancient literature.


Dr. Violet Song, a full-time PhD staff member at AOMA Herbal Medicine, has compiled this list of Chinese herbal remedies to enrich your medicine cabinet. “Often times it is easy to prevent a small problem from developing into a more serious medical situation by incorporating simple Chinese herbs into your home first aid kit,” Dr. Song says. “Chinese herbs work naturally with your body to balance disparities and prevent ailments.”


AOMA Herbal Medicine has a selection of over 350 bulk, powder, patent formulas, tablets, capsules, and extracts. AOMA Herbal Medicine carries only cGMP herbal products.


Common cold

Yin Qiao tablet: wind heat type of common cold

Gan Mao Ling: clear heat

Jing Fang Bai Du Pills: wind cold with dampness (chills, fever, soreness in the body)

Gan Mao Jie Du Chong Ji

Ban Lan Gen Chong Ji: common cold with severe sore throat

White Flower oil: for headache, stuffy nose



Allergies

Pe Min Kan Wan: nasal congestion, runny nose



Diarrhea

Huang Lian: clear heat



Stomach Flu

*Huo Xiang Zheng Qi liquid vial: vomiting, diarrhea, summer heat induced

Curing Pills: food poisoning, nausea, diarrhea



Traumatic injury

*Yun Nan Bai Yao (oral & topical): stop bleeding and move blood

Zheng Gu Shui (topical): tendon and joint pain, sprains, bruises



Burns

Chin Wan Hong ointment (topical)



Food stagnation

Bao He Wan: indigestion, bloating, acid reflux



Bug Bites

White Flower oil (topical)



Motion Sickness

*Huo Xiang Zheng Qi liquid vial (oral)

White Flower oil (topical)



Warning: If symptoms persist or worsen see a health care practitioner. It is wise to check with your doctor before using herbs, as they may interact with medications you take regularly.

*These formulas require a prescription for a licensed herbalist.

 

Acupuncture treatments at the AOMA Clinics include an herbal consultation. At the AOMA Professional Clinics you can also specifically request a personalized herbal prescription without the acupuncture part of the treatment. AOMA patient Samantha Robinson has been coming to AOMA for years. "Since becoming a patient at AOMA, I no longer take allergy and asthma drugs, so thankfully, I also don't have the side effects that come with those drugs. At AOMA, the herbs are custom-prescribed for me every time I go in.  When I take herbs, I get good results from them without all of the side effects that Western drugs have."


Both AOMA clinics have herbal apothecaries next door while other area acupuncturists may call in your prescription to our large dispensary at AOMA Herbal Medicine. Chinese herbs are generally much cheaper than western prescriptions. You can use your health savings account to pay for them at AOMA Herbal Medicine!

Introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Nutrition

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