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Help Shape the Future of the Acupuncture Profession in Texas

  
  
  

The Texas Association of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine is, in essence, a trade association. As such, our job is to protect and promote the business interests of practitioners of acupuncture and Oriental medicine in Texas. I have served as president of TAAOM since 2012. I, and my board, serve in a volunteer capacity with no staff or administrative support to speak of. The association had long been in a state of disrepair, and so I took on the job of TAAOM president because I saw a pressing need.

 

Running a professional association is hard work.  I feel like we have made real progress in Texas in terms of creating some fundamental understanding among acupuncturists about what the role of a state professional association is over the last few years, and that alone is huge. But needless to say, there is much more work to be done.

 

Not uncommonly, there is a tendency to look at association membership in terms of “what’s in it for me?” That’s a really difficult question to answer, and it may even be the wrong question to be asking ultimately. I would like to explore this question a little further and hopefully in doing so convey the imperative to get involved and stay involved. 

 

When you are a dues paying member of your professional association it’s not like you are just buying some goods or services, rather, you are electing to participate in a collective effort to hopefully improve the lot of all Licensed Acupuncturists. So ultimately it is a question of what you are willing to put into it, be that time or money. The work of advocating on behalf of the profession is ongoing work that requires professional representation to be effective, and that requires money. And this work of advocating can seem very intangible at times, as much of it goes unseen.

 

If I had to articulate the single most important concept central to the success of an organization such as TAAOM that would be: “consistency of effort over time.” This is how we get this work done. This means a consistency in funding (the continual payment of membership dues), and consistency in process. This involves both the administrative process of running the organization and continuity in governance. Ultimately, relationships are at the heart of effective advocacy. The various players in the regulatory and legislative arena need to see us as a reasonable and reliable partner – someone they can work with. And that requires a certain organizational stability, and a continuity of presence and message. The bottom line is this: we can shape the future of our profession, or others will gladly step in and do so for us in our absence.

 

Our biggest project currently is the lawsuit against the Texas Board of Chiropractic Examiners. This is a fight that has been a long time coming. The TBCE has a documented history of acting more as a booster organization for the chiropractic profession rather than a regulatory agency, and we think they have overstepped their statutory authority in allowing, and attempting to regulate, the practice of acupuncture by chiropractors. The sole basis for their authority rests on a questionable Attorney General Opinion from 1998. The only reason they have gotten away with this is no one has challenged them. Well…they have now been challenged.

 

The decision to go forward with this legal action was timely based on aspects of a recent Texas Medical Association lawsuit that touched on issues central to our case (the use of needles by chiropractors). This is by no means an easy case, but we have done everything we can to bolster our position. We have hired one of the best firms and best attorneys in the state to represent us. Our lead counsel is former Texas Supreme Court Justice, so we are confident we are in good hands.

 

If you are in Texas, you will be hearing more about this, and over the course of the year TAAOM will be engaging in various fundraising activities. We are looking to cover remaining legal fees and plan for any appeal that may result from this case – as well as keep our lobby team engaged. This is hands down TAAOM’s most significant undertaking since fighting to gain legal status for acupuncture some twenty years ago. We hope you will join us in this effort. If we spread the burden, doing these big, difficult things becomes easy.

 

wally doggett, texas association of acupuncture and oriental medicine Wally Doggett, L.Ac. is a 2004 graduate of AOMA and owner/operator of  South Austin Community Acupuncture. When not busy with his clinic or TAAOM, Wally enjoys luxuriating in his South Austin presidential compound with his wife Kelly, and their two dogs: Cocoa and Clinton.

 

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10 Do-it-Yourself Marketing Tips for Acupuncturists

  
  
  

Despite acupuncture's ancient legacy and modern-day relevance, a vast majority of Americans are still uninformed about what acupuncture is or when and how to seek a trained acupuncture professional.  

Acupuncturists like you must be marketing savvy if you hope to grow your practice and the reach of acupuncture to a wider audience.  

Here are some marketing tips that just might help you grow your brand awareness and win new customers:

1. Open Housesacupuncture open house

Hold regular open houses. Invite the community to learn more about acupuncture and how it has evolved into one of the fastest-growing healthcare practices in America. Keep the group small and intimate to maximize impact.

2. Meetup Group

Try to get speaking engagements in Meetup groups, or even start your own Meetup group to educate people about "alternative" medicine. You'll have to book a steady flow of speakers but it's worth it if it puts you in the center of the healthcare conversation as a respected expert.

3. Target Marketacupuncture target market

Figure out who your best customers are based on frequency of visits and revenue; make a plan to go after them in a more focused way. If you work with lots of senior citizens, then spend more time engaging with retirement centers and other senior resources like AARP. Maybe you can write a regular column for a senior center newsletter!

4. PR

Pitch local news media about acupuncture as it relates to trending topics like helping treat veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine Day, which was on October 24th this year. For hot tips on how to get in the news, consider following my PR over Coffee blog.

5. Emailwoman on computer

Keep your past and current patients up-to-date with regular email campaigns. Consider doing a monthly e-newsletter with lots of interesting facts about acupuncture and alternative medicine so you are constantly "top-of-mind."

6. Social Media Contest

Create a "following" on Facebook, Twitter and other social media outlets; then run occasional contests where you find a fun and clever way to get your followers to engage with you.

7. Loyal Customers

Offer specials that reward your most loyal customers. It will make them feel valued and probably result in more friendly referrals.

8. Holiday Specials

Offer a package deal that is available as a holiday gift for family and friends.

9. Advertising

Advertising is still a way to be seen in a community. Look for a well-read community news outlet (in Austin, we have Community Impact News) and check out the cost of various advertising options. Some are pretty darn affordable.

10. Blog

Keeping a blog on your website is a great way to share information with customers and prospects even as you improve your website's search engine rakings by embedding keywords relevant to your industry. You can also have guest bloggers share related information about acupuncture. (Secret: it's also a great way to avoid having to write a post every week!)


As you can see, there are many ways you can market yourself to customers and the public at large. The key is to be consistent, not expect stellar results overnight, and be ready to stop what doesn't deliver new customers and strong brand awareness.

Slow and steady wins the race!

About Dave Manzer

Dave Manzer is the owner of a PR firm based in Austin, Texas called Dave Manzer PR & Marketing. He works primarily with small businesses and startups and offers a revolutionary pay-for-performance PR model that allows even the smallest businesses a chance to win game-changing publicity. He also runs PR over Coffee, a do-it-yourself PR resources group that has helped hundreds of small businesses figure out how to leverage PR for their benefit.

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5 Practice Management Concepts for Acupuncturists

  
  
  

Gregory Carey is the president of the AOMA Alumni Association. In the latest alumni newsletter he introduces practice management concepts that he believes to be crucial for a successful practice.

1. Join an insurance network. 

acupuncture insuranceBy contracting with a medical insurance carrier (e.g., United Healthcare, Horizon, Cigna, etc.), you are joining a medical referral network. Each insurance carrier introduces a proprietary fee structure for its participating healthcare providers. Becoming familiar with electronic billing practices is an essential, though not overly difficult, skill for the rendering provider. Developing a business relationship with a third-party insurance clearinghouse such as Office Ally is advisable and will create efficiencies for your practice.

2. Join a healthcare group or existing practice.

Especially for new practitioners who are capital-deficient, this step is attractive. Cultivating relationships with other practitioners in the medical field may create opportunities for business relationships to develop. Some acupuncture students have found employment by leveraging a front-office position into full-time practitioner status after obtaining licensure. 

3. Locate to an underserved population center.

This step can seem a daunting undertaking, though the rewards include reduced competition for patient visits. Furthermore, existing medical providers in the area may be eager to refer to a competent acupuncture provider. Upon making a decision as to your practice location, make every attempt to put in place a long-term operational strategy. The personal and professional relationships that you form over the years will pay dividends – if you are still around to receive them.

community acupuncture clinic4. Create a "disruptive" business model.

To increase your competitive advantage, you may want to consider a Community Acupuncture model. There are a number of AOMA Alumni who have chosen a community-based practice set-up. Fellow Alumni may be helpful in sharing practical know-how regarding community-style operations. Community-style acupuncture is one permutation of the healthcare delivery aspect of this business. It’s up to each of us in the field to understand what our respective healthcare markets are asking for and to deliver that product to our clients.   

5. Develop relationships with vendors.

Many are competing for your business consideration, including clinical, herbal, topical, and supplement suppliers. It is not difficult to find another practitioner promoting an herbal or wellness supplement as part of their business. Indeed, some Alumni have created their own product lines! Be discerning when choosing a vendor for your clinic. Ultimately, your patients will be the judge of the products you serve them. If you choose your vendors and products wisely, you have the potential for passive revenue generation, increased referrals, and patient compliance.

 

The above is not intended to be a comprehensive study of items related to practice management. My intention in writing was to communicate some basic considerations relevant to the practicing acupuncturist and to hopefully generate productive discussion. 

For further reading on business innovation, please see:  

Johnson, Mark, Christensen, Clayton, et al. (2008). Reinventing Your Business Model. Harvard Business Review, December 2008.

About the author

Greg Carey, aoma alumni, practice managmentGregory holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology from the University of Richmond and obtained his Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine at AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine. Gregory holds a Diplomate of Oriental Medicine from NCCAOM and is licensed by the New Jersey State Medical Board in acupuncture. His professional background is in research oncology and pharmaceutical trials, teaching and not for profit organizations.

Over the past 6 years Gregory has specialized in Oriental Medicine, including acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, Tuina and Qigong for the successful treatment of a wide variety of conditions.  He is experienced in facial rejuvenation through acupuncture, including the Mei Zen Facial Rejuvenation System. He is a Manalapan, NJ native and is happy to serve surrounding New Jersey communities. His personal interests include the practice of Qigong, Yang Style Tai Ji, Mandarin Chinese, classical literature, hiking and New York Jets football.

Moving to Austin: Finding Roommates & Alternative Housing

  
  
  

There's no doubt that Austin,Texas is a popular place – recently topping the list of the fastest growing cities in the U.S. With such a dynamic environment, it's no wonder that many students choose to pursue acupuncture school at AOMA.

In our first post in the Moving to Austin series, we covered the basics of the Austin rental market. However for students looking for alternative housing in Austin, many opportunities exist including roommate arrangements, house shares, and cooperative living.

Finding a Roommate

Moving to Austin, Finding Roomates in Austin

For students seeking to limit their housing costs, finding a roommate is one of the best options. New residents have a variety of resources available when seeking roommates, including well-known sites like craigslist.org and roomster.com. These sites provide an opportunity to screen and to connect with potential roommates online.

AOMA offers support in the form of a biweekly Housing Digest that enables new students to connect with future classmates and  potential roommates in a secure platform. Throughout the year, current students also post openings for roommates online via AOMA's Housing Opportunities page and LinkedIn group.

When considering a potential roommate, it's important to be clear about your housing preferences. Taking time to consider lifestyle factors like school and/or work schedules, cleanliness, socializing, pet ownership, and personal habits is essential to ensuring a harmonious living environment. Additional factors to assess include the terms of a lease and/or approval from the landlord or property manager.

Cooperative Living & Co-housing 

Housing cooperatives (or “co-ops” for short) are member-ship based legal-entities that own residential real-estate. Becoming a member typically grants one the right to live within the co-op house or building.

A number of housing cooperatives and co-housing communities exist in Austin. Many of these co-ops feature communal living environments where multiple residents occupy a single house or building and work together to manage/maintain the property. For residents, the benefits of co-ops can include reduced housing costs and increased social interaction with roommates. When considering this type of living situation, it's important to account for personal privacy and space needs.

Information about housing cooperatives in Austin can be found through the Austin Co-op Directory.

 Personal Preferences

Alternative housing may not be for everyone. Depending on your personal or family needs, more traditional housing may be a better fit. No matter your preferences, Austin has a wide variety of options available to support your lifestyle.

Why Everyone is Moving to Austin

Life in Austin, Texas

 AOMA Student Housing Opportunities

AOMA Apartment Locators List

Article Contributors:

describe the imageJustine Meccio

Justine is the Director of Admissions for AOMA's graduate programs and works regularly to support new students in their transition to AOMA & Austin. A native to of the east coast, she relocated from New York five years ago. Since moving to Austin, she has lived in four different zip codes and is happy to share her personal knowledge of the city with newcomers.  

 

 

Take a Virtual Campus Tour Visit AOMA and Austin, TX

Integrative Medicine Videos: Acupuncture, Qigong, and Meditation

  
  
  

The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) at the National Institutes of Health produces videos about the research on complementary health approaches. The three videos presented here explain some of the most popular integrative medicine practices: acupuncture, qigong, and meditation.

What happens during an Acupuncture session?

This video narrates the basic historical and theoretical background of acupuncture while also giving a step by step guide on what to expect during an acupuncture treatment such as possible physical sensations, different acupuncture techniques, and the importance of finding a qualified practitioner.

 

Qigong

This video explains how the practice of Qigong can enhance the flow of energy in the body through movement, meditation, and regulation of breathing; and in turn, how it can benefit your daily life.

Meditation

This video shows the practice of meditation and how it can result in a state of greater calmness, physical relaxation, and psychological balance.

Introduction to Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine

 

 

 

 

Research at AOMA: Unravelling the Relationship between Biomarkers of Aging and Vitamin D Metabolism

  
  
  

describe the imageJohn S. Finnell, ND, MPH, LAc is AOMA’s director of research, as well as doctoral program director. Dr. Finnell’s latest research project “Unravelling the Relationship between Biomarkers of Aging and Vitamin D Metabolism” investigates the possibility that correction of vitamin D insufficiency in humans may result in increased expression of Klotho, an anti-aging protein tightly involved in vitamin D homeostasis. Deficiency of Klotho confers an age-like phenotype in multiple mammalian species. Decreased Klotho protein expression has been implicated in rapid aging and increased oxidative stress, and potentially contributes to increased disease risk and all-cause mortality associated with vitamin D insufficiency. Dr. Finnell and his research team hypothesize that treating vitamin D insufficiency may result in changes in circulating Klotho levels. They expect that this research may lead to a better understanding of the health benefits of sufficient vitamin D status.

The first results of this research were published online on March 31, 2014 in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism as “Impact of Vitamin D3 Dietary Supplement Matrix on Clinical Response”. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jc.2013-3162

Read more about current research project at AOMA.

Apply to AOMA

 

First DAOM Cohort: Why They Chose AOMA's Doctoral Program

  
  
  

The first cohort of DAOM students share why they chose AOMA’s doctor of acupuncture and Oriental medicine program.

daom program student, debbie vaughn“My choice to pursue my doctorate at AOMA is an easy one because my experience at AOMA (in the master’s program) went beyond all my expectations. The professors and clinic supervisors were outstanding professionals, approachable and eager to support my learning. When the program was over, I felt very well prepared to begin my practice. I have nothing but enthusiasm about returning.” – Debbie Vaughn

The DAOM at AOMA focuses on the care and management of patients with pain and associated psychosocial phenomena. This has been a key deciding factor for some in choosing the program.

daom program student, pamela gregg flax“The AOMA doctoral program on pain care and the psychosocial world offers an exploration of what it means to be human, and that interests me. Pain as a locus of inquiry and a portal into human consciousness is simply brilliant. Pain is a pivot point for people, one that is difficult to ignore and a primary reason for visiting a Chinese medical practitioner.” – Pamela Gregg Flax

Learners develop advanced skills and techniques to care for patients in a collaborative medical setting, and benefit directly from a number of integrative clinical education opportunities.

daom program student, thang bui“When my patients entrust their health to my knowledge, I believe that it is my responsibility to continue learning and become the best that I can. Initially, I chose AOMA because I had heard of Dr. William Morris, his profound knowledge in TCM and pulse-taking techniques, and his dedication to the TCM field. After finishing two terms at AOMA, I realized that all of the faculty here are also the best in their specialties. This is rare to find. The guest lecturers are also the best in their field and are willing to share their knowledge and success. Not only is TCM taught more in-depth, but biomedicine and research methods are also emphasized. Moreover, AOMA has the affiliation with hospitals and other major universities where I will be able to learn an integrative approach to healthcare and get access to the tools needed for my research.” - Thang Quoc Bui


DAOM graduates gain research experience and are prepared to participate in the broader dialogue surrounding the efficacy of TCM and its integration with mainstream paradigms of healthcare. AOMA’s doctoral program prepares learners to explore paradigms of inquiry and use both quantitative and qualitative assessment to conduct and publish individual or group research projects.

daom program student, james phillipsIt is now time to move forward and forge new dreams, to build on what I know and journey into what I do not. We need innovative thinkers and healthcare providers to create explainable models describing the mechanisms behind the tools that we use.” - James Phillips


AOMA DAOM graduates are poised for medical academic leadership. Licensed acupuncturists with a doctoral degree cultivate expertise in the field, becoming more effective health care providers and sought-after scholars.

daom program student, donna guthrey“After 10 years of private practice, I am ready to prepare myself for teaching. The philosophy and structure of the doctoral program at AOMA will further my skills and knowledge to prepare me for teaching in a master’s level program in Oriental medicine, so that new students understand the foundations of Oriental medicine. I think a doctoral level education is necessary to offer this level of teaching.” – Donna Guthery


AOMA’s first cohort of doctor of acupuncture and Oriental medicine students are learning essential skills, preparing to succeed as instructors, researchers or leaders in the field, and also to improve clinical outcomes and provide a higher level of care to patients.

Download Introduction to DAOM Apply to AOMA  

5 Benefits of Doctoral Education in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine

  
  
  
AOMA’s doctoral program director, Dr. John Finnell, shares what he believes to be the top benefits of attaining a doctor of acupuncture and Oriental medicine degree.

More than ever, I believe that doctoral and post-graduate education prepare the next generation of thought leaders and clinicians to move the field of acupuncture and Oriental medicine forward.

Our role in healthcareacupuncture role in healthcare

Our healthcare landscape needs highly trained clinicians, researchers, and leaders to move the profession forward. Doctoral-level education provides parity at the policymaking table. This may operate institutionally, governmentally, or within the domain of patient care. Parity by title levels the playing field with regard to co-operative patient care.

Leadership

While a doctoral degree alone does not confer success, it does provide one with a credential to fill leadership positions within academia, act as the principle investigator on NIH-funded research, teach at the doctoral level, and oversee doctoral-level clinical education.

professional acupuncture opportunitiesProfessional opportunities

The respect brought by the doctoral title is a feature which enhances patient care and establishes parity with other doctorally prepared professions. Specifically, licensed acupuncturists with a doctorate often find better prospects for hospital employment and faculty positions, and for obtaining research grants and a seat at the table in policy-making processes.

 

Move the profession forward

Doctoral training does provide the rare opportunity for us to explore our intellectual passions and create a new body of knowledge as the fruit of our scholarship. This same scholarship is the cornerstone to the foundation upon which our profession is built. This is not a stagnant process; the evolution of acupuncture and Oriental medicine (AOM) in North America must be actualized through participation of its members. 

Actualizing requires a few key ingredients: vision, action, perseverance, belief, and transformation. All of these ingredients may be found as you pursue your career path. AOMA's DAOM program provides the platform upon which to solidify your role in the actualization of the field of AOM in the next century.

Lifetime learningdaom students

Finally, there are those of us who truly believe in the power of this medicine and want to learn as much as we can to better serve our patients. Improving your knowledge in pain management and the psychosocial aspects associated with pain is certain to improve patient outcomes and your satisfaction as an advanced practitioner of Chinese medicine.

Author bio

Dr. John doctoral program director is an accomplished researcher and skilled health care practitioner with a rich academic and professional background. His interest in lifestyle and environmental determinants of health led him to earn a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine and a Master of Science in Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine from Bastyr University, as well as a Master of Public Health in Epidemiology from the University of Washington. As a practitioner of Naturopathic and Chinese medicines, Dr. Finnell’s clinical focus is on nutrition, pharmacognosy, herb-drug interactions, mind-body medicine, disease prevention, and lifestyle education. In addition to maintaining a professional Naturopathic and Chinese medicine practice, Dr. Finnell has also completed a post-doctoral fellowship with the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), and served as the acting Director of Research for the TrueNorth Health Foundation. Dr. Finnell’s strong research background and clinical experience as a Naturopathic and Chinese medicine practitioner enable him to bring an evidence-based and integrative perspective to AOMA’s doctoral program.

Download Introduction to DAOM Apply to AOMA  

3 Reasons to Start Acupuncture School at AOMA this Summer

  
  
  

AOMA’s Master of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine program is a transformative educational experience that prepares students to begin careers as professional acupuncturists and herbalists. The program combines extensive clinical education with rigorous & comprehensive coursework in acupuncture theory & techniques, Chinese herbal medicine, biomedicine, mind-bodywork, and Asian body-work therapy.

Here are 3 reasons to begin your studies this summer at AOMA: 

1. Small Class-size Supports Learning & Connection

New students can apply to begin the program at three points per year: the summer, the fall, or the winter quarters. However, the summer term often sees the smallest incoming cohort with typically about 15 students starting the master’s program each July. For new students, a small class size fosters a tight-knit sense of community, allowing you to get to know your peers very well.

start acupuncture school this summer student body cumbo quote2. Flexibility

The summer quarter is only 8 weeks long. As a result, students’ academic load is often is lighter in the summer – meaning students frequently take fewer total credit hours than during other terms. Starting as a new student in the summer term with a lighter load is a great way to soften the transition to graduate school – especially if several years have passed since you were last in a classroom. You’ll become acclimated to the classroom environment, learn to incorporate school into your personal life, and “get into the groove” academically with fewer courses to balance.

Start Acupuncture School This Summer Robert Laguna

3. Make the Most of Your Summer

Summer in central Texas is often the season when many locals take it easy or even take vacations. Why not spend your summer in Austin, TX getting to know the city and enjoying the laid-back lifestyle? You can dodge the summer heat by spending your days inside air conditioned classrooms pursuing your passion and taking study breaks at beautiful Barton Springs!

Start Today Acupuncture School Karen Lamb QuoteBegin your journey this summer with classes starting on July 21, 2014!

Apply to AOMA

Funding a Graduate Degree in Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine

  
  
  

“Knowledge is like money: to be of value it must circulate, and in circulating it can increase in quantity and, hopefully, in value.”   Louis L’Amour

Seekers of knowledge know the value of a great education. The cost of attending graduate school can be daunting to those who don’t know all of their options. Learners at AOMA have many choices for funding the masters and doctoral degrees in acupuncture and Oriental medicine.

 

Financial Literacy

Developing financial literacy should be the first step in the process of exploring your funding options. Learners who manage their finances closely while enrolled lay a foundation for better financial health after graduation. Many AOMA students choose to work while they are in acupuncture school, and use this income to offset the amount they need to borrow for tuition expenses.

In an effort to encourage students to avoid and/or minimize debt, AOMA recommends that you to investigate all possible sources of financial support prior to borrowing, and borrow only if absolutely necessary. In situations where other funding sources do not exist and you choose to fund your education through student loans, we encourage you to budget carefully. Careful financial management before, during, and after enrollment can reduce overall debt and create a solid financial foundation from which you can grow after graduation.

To assist students in this process, the AOMA financial aid office provides support and resources for students in the area of budgeting and money management. You can read more on our financial literacy page or contact the financial services administrator to make an appointment for financial advising.

 

Types of Financial Aid

Financial aid opportunities for studying acupuncture and Oriental medicine at AOMA include Federal Direct Student Loans, Federal Work Study, veteran's/military tuition benefits, and scholarships.

Direct Student Loans

AOMA is certified by the Department of Education to participate in the Title IV Federal Student Aid program. Loans include the Direct Unsubsidized and Direct PLUS Loans for graduate students. Direct Loans are low-interest loans issued by the federal government to students enrolled in eligible programs at least half-time (six credits). Read more about Direct Loans.

Federal Work Study

The Federal Work Study (FWS) program provides part-time employment to AOMA students with financial need, in order to help cover the cost of attendance. In addition to financial support, the FWS program offers relevant training that supports post-graduate student success. Finally, the FWS program encourages students to participate in community service activities and literacy projects throughout the Austin area. Find out more about work study jobs at AOMA.

Scholarships

AOMA awards a number of scholarships each year to current students. Scholarships include: the President’s award, the AOMA Scholarship, and the Golden Flower Chinese Herbs Scholarship. The number and amount of scholarships awarded depend on the funds available each year. Peruse an extensive list of available scholarships.

Veteran’s Benefits

AOMA is approved by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for the training of veterans and other eligible persons. In order to receive Veteran’s Benefits, the veteran must first establish his/her eligibility with the VA. Once eligibility has been established, AOMA certifies the veteran’s enrollment. Read more about veteran’s benefits and military tuition assistance.

 

Applying for Financial Aid

Step 1: The FAFSA

The first step in applying for financial aid for acupuncture college is the completion of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA is used to determine your eligibility for all forms of federal aid, including Direct Unsubsidized Loans and Federal Work Study. AOMA also awards some scholarships on the basis of financial need, so we encourage you to complete a FAFSA even if you do not intend to request student loans. Veteran's/Active Duty Military benefits have an alternate application process.

The FAFSA is completed online at www.fafsa.ed.gov and the process typically takes five to seven days.  In addition to supplying your Social Security Number (or alien registration or permanent resident card if you are not a U.S. citizen), you will also need to have records of money earned during the previous tax year and AOMA's School Code (031564).

FAFSA Results

You receive the results of your FAFSA in the form of a Student Aid Report (SAR). The SAR is delivered electronically in an email from the Federal Student Aid office of the Department of Education. Please review your SAR very carefully! The SAR is multiple pages long and contains important information about your financial aid eligibility, including your EFC and a report of any potential issues that may prevent you from obtaining financial aid.

Once you have received and reviewed your SAR, please contact the AOMA Financial Aid Office. We can advise you regarding your eligibility and the remaining steps in the application process.

Step 2: AOMA Financial Aid Process

After completion of the FAFSA, prospective students should communicate with the Admissions Office and complete their application to the Master’s or Doctoral program according to the published admissions deadlines.

If accepted into an AOMA graduate program in Chinese medicine, your next step will be to register for classes and meet with the Financial Services Administrator for preliminary financial aid advising. During this meeting you will be able to discuss financial options, develop a budget for your first terms, and to complete all necessary financial aid paperwork. Students can work with the Admissions Office to schedule both their registration and financial aid advising appointments.    

Download Checklist: Completing the FAFSA Step\u002Dby\u002DStep

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